Home > Preventable Diseases, Testimonials, Vaccine Advocacy, Vaccine Myths > My Polio Story is an Inconvenient Truth to Those Who Refuse Vaccines

My Polio Story is an Inconvenient Truth to Those Who Refuse Vaccines

by Judith Shaw Beatty

In 1949, the year I was hit by the poliovirus, 42,000 cases of polio were reported in the United States and 2,720 people died, most of them children.

JudithAtTheBeach

Here I am at the beach with my mom and my sister before I contracted polio.

I was diagnosed with paralytic poliomyelitis, which is experienced in less than 1 percent of poliovirus infections. Not only did it immobilize me completely from the neck down, it also attacked my lungs. It was August, a popular month for polio, and I was six years old.

A few weeks before, my parents, younger sister and I had moved from the outskirts of New York City to Rowayton, Connecticut, which back then was a small town of 1,200 people.  My father had gotten a job as associate editor at Collier’s Magazine and my mother was a homemaker, and our new two-story house with its big yard was in sharp contrast to the tiny apartment we had come from.

The poliovirus attacks very quickly.

I was playing with other children at a lawn party and developed such a terrible headache we had to go home. When I woke up the next morning, my legs were so weak I couldn’t stand on them and I could barely lift my arms. It took all day for the doctor to visit the house and examine me, and that night I was taken to the Englewood Hospital in Bridgeport and put in an iron lung.

My mother told me years later that the prognosis was very poor and I was expected to die within hours.

JudithPolioMonthBeforeDiagnosis

This photo was taken at a garden party, just one month before I contracted polio.

One of the children I was playing with at the party was John Leavitt, who many years later went to work in the field of biotechnology at the Bureau of Biologics of the FDA. Part of his work involved growing live poliovirus, and it was necessary to be tested for polio antibody titre. All those years later, he learned that he must have had the natural polio infection based on the results.

Now, looking back, we realize that while I went home and ended up in an iron lung, John ended up with a flu-like disease with no paralysis.  To this day, no one knows why the vast majority of people attacked by the virus recovered with no residual effect and so many others went on to spend the rest of their lives in wheelchairs.

After I was taken to the hospital, the health department put a yellow quarantine sign on the front of our house and at the end of our driveway.

My mother said that when she and Dad would go to the beach in town, people would grab their blankets and umbrellas and move. At the grocery store, my mother said she could hear people whispering and staring. No one wanted to be near my family. Everybody knew of somebody who had died from polio or was crippled by it, and 1949 turned out to be a record year. At its peak in the 1940s and 1950s, polio would paralyze or kill 500,000 people worldwide every year. And there was no vaccine for it, so there was no defense against this invisible, raging monster that struck indiscriminately.

I have no memory of being in the iron lung.

People came to visit me, but I don’t remember any of that. I don’t know how long I was in it, either, but I remember waking up in a bed and looking over and seeing this enormous gray metal cylinder with windows along the sides and wondering what it was. I thought maybe there were tiny people living inside.

During those first few weeks, there were 200 children in my hospital ward with more arriving every day.

Some of the children were toddlers or babies in diapers, paralyzed and crying, and their family members were not allowed near them. There was a lot of commotion and noise. I just lay there, day after day, listening to it. There was chicken wire nailed to the door of my room and it had to be unhooked for someone to come in. I remember my parents coming to visit and leaning over the wire to wave at me, and throwing small gifts that they hoped would land on my bed. They were not permitted to approach me.

There were not enough nurses.

I got very little attention, and when I did, I wasn’t treated very well and my wants and needs were not readily met. I think the nurses must have been going crazy.   I remember spilling a bowl of cereal on myself, lying in the wet mess for hours and then being shouted at and shamed by someone very frustrated and upset. I was just getting my strength back, but I was extremely weak and really couldn’t do much. I was given books to read, and with the limited knowledge I had of the alphabet, I taught myself to read and had reached fourth grade reading level when I finally went home. The first book I ever read was “The Sleepy Kitten.”

There was a wringer-washer at the other end of my room next to a big porcelain sink. Twice a day, a nurse would fill the washer tub with steaming hot water and then run cut-up old army blankets through the mangle and wrap them around my arms, legs and midriff. They called them hot packs, and they were painfully uncomfortable.  The smell of wet wool is with me to this day and brings up deep emotions. This treatment, which included whirlpool baths, was a clinical method developed and promoted by Australian nurse Sister Elizabeth Kenny, and I believe it saved me from a lifetime of total paralysis.

After a few weeks, both of my arms and my right leg recovered but my left leg did not.

The nurses then told me I would be transferred to another floor in the hospital and that all of my books and toys would have to be incinerated or given to other infected children. I left everything behind when I left that room several weeks later.

JudithPolio7thBirthday1949

This photo was taken on my 7th birthday in October, 1949.  I was home on a two-day “furlough” from the hospital.

My new room downstairs had three other children in it.  One of them was a young teenager named Lois, and we got to be friends even though she was much older than me. I thought she was very sophisticated. The nurses on this floor were equally overworked and frustrated.  None of us could walk, so we were at their mercy and sometimes had to fend for ourselves. This included passing a bedpan around until it was full because we couldn’t get anyone to give us a clean one, and sharing food.

At this stage of my illness, I was allowed to go home on two-day “furloughs” for my birthday and Christmas. When I went home for my seventh birthday in late October, my parents had invited some children my age to help entertain me. It was still warm outside and I lay on a lounge chair and watched the children play tag. The next day, it was back to the hospital for another two months until Christmas.

I was finally discharged in mid January 1950, five months after my diagnosis, and was fitted for a steel and leather leg brace that extended from my ankle up to my hip. I used wooden crutches.

As soon as I was home from the hospital I was sent off to the first grade, which I was utterly unprepared for emotionally, physically, socially and psychologically.  I’d already missed the first six months of school, so started off way behind. I had extreme anxiety that would boil over when my mother left my sight because I thought she would never come back.  I had a wretched time focusing on anything.  I had no idea about asking to go to the restroom and peed in my pants. I didn’t know how to make friends, and clumping around with a heavy steel leg brace and crutches certainly meant I couldn’t play any sports. I used to stand on the playground and watch the other kids jump rope and play hide and seek. I fell dozens of times because I wasn’t coordinated or because the lock on the hinge of my brace would fail. Once, I broke my wrist. I also would sprain my ankle. My right knee, the “good knee,” was a bloody mess sometimes.  I coped by developing a rich fantasy world. Sometimes, it caused problems. One time in class, we were given crayons and a picture of a tree to color. I colored the leaves brown and the trunk green, which looked perfectly okay to me but made the teacher mad. I don’t think I learned anything that school year, and in the second grade I had a tutor instead of going to school.

Judy Post Polio with Sister

Here I am pictured with my sister Janis in Roxbury, CT when I was just 9 years old.

In the following year, I had my first major surgery, which was at Stamford Hospital in Connecticut.

My ankle was fused to keep my foot stable, and I spent about a month in the hospital. Two years after that, I spent three weeks in Boston Children’s Hospital after they removed the growth platelets from my “good” leg to minimize the difference in leg lengths.  By that time, I had severe scoliosis and had been wearing a back brace. Because the back brace was so heavy and bulky, my dresses had to be specially made. I was fitted for my first bra while in the hospital. My mother brought it to me and I tried it on with the sheet pulled over my head for privacy. I also got my first kiss in the hospital, from another patient. It’s amusing to me, oddly enough, that I experienced these rites of passage while hospitalized.

That was the year of the first clinical trial of the Salk vaccine, which was pronounced successful.

I read about it in the newspaper. People stood in line for hours waiting for the shot when it became available in 1955. I didn’t have the vaccine because I was immune. In the years that followed, there were so few polio cases that people only heard about the rare ones that would crop up somewhere in another state, and those stories were so unusual they’d be in the newspaper.

About four years ago, my story was published online and then shared by people on Facebook. I became active in advocating for the importance of vaccines and, for the first time, learned that there were people out there who opposed vaccinations of any kind.

Judith Beatty Today

I share my personal story in hopes that it will encourage polio vaccination and support of polio eradication.

I’ve been hearing from them ever since. Either they declare that I never really had polio, or else they insist that polio is still around and has new names because the vaccine was ineffective and that this is part of a cover-up by “big pharma.” Other people, in an effort to shut me up, angrily point out that they know someone who was permanently paralyzed by the polio vaccine or injured by it in some unspecified way, as though that should be a reason for getting rid of the vaccine altogether. Now, these same people are claiming that it was DDT that created the polio epidemics, even though there is evidence that polio existed in ancient Egypt and that more recent epidemics preceded the introduction of DDT.

The lack of compassion expressed by these people is startling. I’ve never interacted with a vaccine refuser who cared one way or the other about my life as a polio survivor. They don’t want to hear about it because I’m an inconvenient truth, just like all the other polio survivors I know.  On Facebook, I’m lectured and attacked by arrogant people who claim they know a lot more than I do about polio.

Vaccine preventable diseases like measles, chickenpox and whooping cough are experiencing resurgence all over the U.S. 

People who oppose vaccines, who themselves were very likely vaccinated as children but do not extend the same privilege to their own offspring, insist that all disease is caused solely by bad water and poor sanitation. In fact, they will insist there wouldn’t be any disease at all if everyone ate organic food and washed their hands more often, and that polio attacks people in Africa because Africa is unsanitary. Actually, Africa has been polio free for more than a year, thanks to an intense immunization campaign.

I live less than three hours from Colorado, which has the lowest vaccination rate in the country, and in some areas of the state, the immunization rate is lower than in Sub-Saharan Africa. This means that someone flying in from Pakistan or Afghanistan, the only two countries left where polio is still paralyzing and killing people, could theoretically infect children in Colorado were it not for herd immunity. According to the World Health Organization, failure to eradicate polio from these last remaining strongholds could result in as many as 200,000 new cases every year, within 10 years, all over the world.

Recently, someone pointed out to me that natural immunity is preferable to any vaccine at all based on a false belief that disease strengthens the immune system.  Vaccine preventable diseases continue to kill millions of people every year around the world. And just speaking personally, yes, I am immune to polio, but the damage it did was hardly worth it.

 

 

  1. reissd
    June 8, 2016 at 12:34 pm

    Judith is such an incredible, talented writer and a wonderful advocate. Once again, her story reached into my heart and reminded me why it’s important to speak up for children, to protect them from having to face things like this. Thank you for giving her a platform.

    Like

  2. Cathy
    June 8, 2016 at 3:26 pm

    Hello Judith. Your story is tragic and extremely moving. What an awful experience of both disease and hospital/social (lack of) care you had to suffer through. Thank you for sharing it. I am sorry you have had such negative encounters with people who choose not to vaccinate. I am moved to comment by your sentence “I’ve never interacted with a vaccine refuser who cared one way or the other about my life as a polio survivor.”

    I’d like to share my family’s story with you. I have four children. the first was born premature, but the doctors insisted that he should still receive his vaccinations “on time” – from his birth age, rather than his gestational age. He is fully vaccinated. He suffered apparently minor negative reactions (distress, excessive crying, fever) to his first round of infant vaccinations. He now has an ASD diagnosis, a “lifelong disability” according to the paediatrician. My third child had an adverse reaction to his measles vaccine – he basically had the measles, complete with high fever, vomiting and diarrhea, and red rash. He is also likely to be on the spectrum but has not yet been assessed. Given these experiences, I have chosen not to vaccinate my youngest child. I can completely understand why, given your experiences, you would be resolutely pro-vaccine. And I would never presume to say I knew more about polio than you. I do know that, at present, it has been eradicated in my country, and should that situation change, I would certainly reconsider whether to vaccinate my youngest.

    Please understand that the majority of “anti-vax” parents were once “pro-vax” parents, until their child suffered an adverse effect. We are all on the same side, really. We all want to protect our children from debilitating illness. We all make judgements of how to best do that, based on our own experiences.

    Like

  3. reissd
    June 8, 2016 at 3:30 pm

    While the temporary reactions you describe can be caused by vaccines, though the MMR rash is not exactly measles, ASD is not a vaccine reaction. I can understand why a parent distressed by a child having a high fever would be nervous about vaccinating, but really, it’s a poor reason not to protect your last child. In fact, if what the weakened vaccine virus’ effects distressed you saw, I’m surprised that you are willing to leave your youngest without protection against the virulent wild virus.

    In other words, Judith’s experiences certainly shape her outlook, but her inclusion – that vaccines would prevent the harm and protect children – are well supported by the evidence.

    Your conclusions are natural, given your experience, but go against the evidence. Your motives may be to protect your children, but your choice goes the other way.

    It is important for parents to base their choices on experiences supported by evidence, not countered by it.

    Liked by 5 people

  4. Lawrence
    June 8, 2016 at 3:59 pm

    @Cathy – why wouldn’t you think that the fact your baby was born premature was the deciding factor in receiving an ASD diagnosis?

    And how, biologically, would a reaction to the MMR lead to autism?

    Liked by 4 people

  5. June 8, 2016 at 5:13 pm

    Hi Judith, I believe you are a polio survivor. I live with a compromised immune system. I had 4 miscarriages and one live birth. She was born healthy and still is. She is 20. I had Stevens-Johnson Syndrome at the age of 42 with a five-year-old daughter. To this day, I still go to Cleveland Clinic for my care. I was a nurse for twenty years before becoming disabled. My daughter had all of her vaccines on schedule. I breast fed her totally, it was the mom or nothing. Now with things that I have seen and heard, my child would not be vaccinated as an infant. I would wait a while before she would get them. I believe that it is the chemicals and preservatives in the vaccines that do the damage to the infants and small children. My opinion.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Lawrence
    June 8, 2016 at 5:20 pm

    @Barbara – yet you just said that your daughter is fine. I bet your daughter didn’t get any of the diseases she was vaccinated for either….

    Liked by 1 person

  7. June 8, 2016 at 8:53 pm

    Cathy- Autism can be detected in the womb, before the baby is even born nowadays. It is detected when the child is born and does not make eye contact with the parent, because infants prefer faces to anything else out there. It has been proven over and over again, that Autism is NOT connected to vaccinations.

    Liked by 2 people

  8. barry scofield
    June 8, 2016 at 8:55 pm

    Polio like many disease’s of the past virtually have disappeared thanks to things like the Salk vaccine, unfortunately some very stupid people who didn’t live through the epidemics that swept the world leaving a trail of death and paralysis in the 40’s 50’s and 60’s haven’t a clue how as kids we were told not to go to public swimming pools and many considered a potential source were closed for months.. One wonders when the next ebola virus or similar occurs in their own neighborhood if their principals will remain or if they will be pushing their way to the front of the queue

    Like

  9. Abby
    June 8, 2016 at 11:40 pm

    I seriously cannot believe people would risk their children contracting the diseases that vaccines prevent over some fear of chemicals and preservatives.

    Thank you Judith for sharing your story. I’m certain not everybody is as stubborn and arrogant as some of the other commenters.

    Like

  10. Patrick
    June 9, 2016 at 11:02 am

    Cathy,

    You should have your child’s genetics done to see if predisposed for vaccine injury. I would be happy to help you.

    Like

  11. June 9, 2016 at 12:21 pm

    I remember when they announced the vaccine was ready for people to take. The only time in my life I saw my Mother break down and sob. Nobody in our family had polio, but the fear of it, and the worry about it caused many sleepless nights for many people. I had a friend that told me the hot wraps probably saved her from severe disability. Thank you for this story. People tend to forget, I think.

    Like

  12. fai
    June 9, 2016 at 12:21 pm

    I always love how people would rather their kids be dead than autistic.

    Liked by 2 people

  13. Chris
    June 9, 2016 at 12:24 pm

    Patrick: “You should have your child’s genetics done to see if predisposed for vaccine injury.”

    Please list the PubMed indexed paper where those sequences have been listed, with references to the studies where they were found. It should be something similar to this reference that was on my son’s genetic report for his heart disorder (by the way he did not have any of the eighteen sequences).

    Liked by 1 person

  14. June 9, 2016 at 12:57 pm

    I really don’t understand those anti-vax weirdos. I’m sorry you went through so much hell. The thought of those diseases coming back is terrifying and those stupid anti-vax morons are to blame. I don’t understand how anyone can be anti-vax. I guess some people want to be cool, hip and alternative and are selfish enough to sacrifice their kids and society to be cool.

    Like

  15. Patrick
    June 9, 2016 at 3:26 pm

    Chris – if you are interested i would be happy to help you too.

    Like

  16. Chris
    June 9, 2016 at 3:51 pm

    Excellent! You can start by providing that paper with the list of genetic sequences. If you want you can just post its PubMed Identification Number.

    Like

  17. Patrick
    June 9, 2016 at 3:57 pm

    No need for any pf that Chris. I will email you all the info you need.

    Like

  18. Chris
    June 9, 2016 at 4:11 pm

    No, you will not get my email. Share that paper with everyone, otherwise it will make you look like someone who is trying to drum up business.

    Like

  19. Patrick
    June 9, 2016 at 4:42 pm

    What paper? Drum up business for what? I have nothing to sell. If you want information I will happily email it to you, but I will not give the information here so you can ridicule and harass me.

    Like

  20. Lawrence
    June 9, 2016 at 4:47 pm

    Ignore Patrick…he’s just here to shill for something.

    Like

  21. Patrick
    June 9, 2016 at 5:08 pm

    No, I commented to help Cathy, if she wants some help.

    Like

  22. Chris
    June 9, 2016 at 5:14 pm

    Patrick, how are you qualified to help Cathy? How come you told her get a genetic screening, but you can’t come up with the evidence those genetic sequences are known? Why would I ridicule and harass you for information I have already received from the company that performed the tests on my son’s blood to determine with sequence caused his heart disorder?

    Like

  23. Patrick
    June 9, 2016 at 5:17 pm

    Chris I have moved on from you. It is not your business.
    I can supply Cathy with information to have genetics done on her children that can be used as a road map for health and show predisposition to vaccine injury etc.

    Like

  24. Chris
    June 9, 2016 at 5:19 pm

    So how are going to send it to Cathy? Do you plan to post your email address on this blog?

    Like

  25. Kerry
    June 9, 2016 at 5:45 pm

    As the mother of a child with autism, I am appalled by the parents who would rather leave their children at risk for diseases that kill than risk having a child with a “lifelong disability”, to quote Cathy. Also, to those that believe vaccines cause autism-how do you account for things like families with genetic heritability for autism? There are families with multiple autistic members. Identical twins are also more likely to both be autistic than fraternal twins, because of that genetic link. How do you account for children who were never vaccinated but still were found to be autistic? I can’t help but suspect that people tend to treat those facts as “inconvenient truths”, much as Judith herself has been treated. And to whomever the commenter was that said most anti-vaccine activists started out as being pro-vaccine, I’d like to suggest that you read up on parents who became pro-vaccine really quickly after their children contracted illnesses like whooping cough and measles. They realized that their fears about vaccines were misinformed.

    Liked by 1 person

  26. Lawrence
    June 9, 2016 at 7:18 pm

    No such genetic testing exists, Patrick.

    Liked by 1 person

  27. Chris
    June 9, 2016 at 8:09 pm

    Lawrence, his “i would be happy to help you too” offers were also a bit creepy.

    Like

  28. Joel A. Harrison, PhD, MPH
    June 9, 2016 at 9:59 pm

    @ Patrick

    You won’t put in a comment the URLs for the articles you base your claim to want to help people because you don’t want to open yourself to ridicule?

    If the articles are in peer-reviewed journals, how would sharing them with others in a comment open you to ridicule? Or, maybe they aren’t in peer-reviewed journals, just more garbage from the world of alternative and complementary medicine. Though I won’t claim to have covered every possible article, as far as I know, no genetic sequences can tell in general if a child would be prone to an adverse event in general. However, if one suspects a specific genetic problem, such as a mitochondrial disorder, then there are some tests that give some sequences for mitochondrial disorders; but not all, so a child may have a mitochondrial disorder and still a genetic screening wouldn’t detect it. In addition, most children with mitochondrial disorders do fine with vaccines. Hannah Poling was given a lot of vaccines as catch-up because she had been ill long periods of time and couldn’t be vaccinated. Had she been able to get the normal timed vaccines she may not have had a problem. Quite simply, most people with mitochondrial disorders can handle mild stresses.

    And as I wrote in a comment to another article on this blog, knowing she had been ill for such long periods should have alerted her doctor that she had a problem and he/she either should have considered the possibility of a mitochondrial disorder and ordered testing or, at least, arranged to spread out her vaccines, a couple of weeks between them. But, as I said, there is no evidence that one or two vaccines at a time would cause adverse events in most children with mitochondrial disorders. However, if some child, as Hannah Poling, has had long periods of on again and off again health problems, then, if I were her physicians I would give her one or, at most two vaccines at any one visit and order testing to find the underlying cause. As I wrote in the other comment, don’t blame the vaccines, blame the doctor.

    Back to your STUPID claim that putting in a comment the URLs to articles would open you to ridicule. Your ridiculous statement has already done that!

    Like

  29. Barbara
    June 9, 2016 at 10:11 pm

    Thank you for continuing the effort to support vaccination. My Mother contracted Bulbar Polio&died within 10 days at age 30. Vaccinations are necessary&we are fortunate to have them available.

    Like

  30. Joel A. Harrison, PhD, MPH
    June 9, 2016 at 10:15 pm

    @ Judith

    Thanks for your story. As a child my mother wouldn’t let me go to the municipal swimming pool. In my elementary school was one student wearing a heavy leg brace. I was the first generation to get the Salk Vaccine, probably sometime summer 1955. And I could go and learn to swim.

    Later in life I met a man who had been in an iron lung for over 30 years. He could leave for short periods of time with a portable respirator and someone to push him around in a wheelchair as he was quadriplegic. Polio had taken his ability to use his limbs and to breath on his own.

    A close friend had an older sister who ended a quadriplegic from polio. I met the sister several times. My friend’s mother insisted she volunteer as a young child in the actual polio vaccine trials in 1954 which she did.

    Later in life, I met several times the wife of a colleague. One day she showed up walking with a cane. I asked him what was going on. He explained she had had polio as a child, overcome it, but now was suffering from post-polio syndrome. Stupid me, never heard of it before; but I read up on it and was appalled. To think that all these kids went through a literal hell, overcame it, and then 30 – 40 years later it was still there. I had to fight back tears.

    Over the years I have probably read just about every book out there on polio and several hundred journal article, plus a biography of Salk. Antivaccinationist really upset me; but when it comes to their attitude towards polio and the polio vaccine, it angers me. Besides all my reading, having known personally and seen close up how polio affected people, this is one subject that antivaccinationists just should really shut up on. As far as I’m concerned they are belittling the suffering of 10s of thousands of children. They just don’t know when to draw the line.

    Thanks again for your story. I’m sure ALL decent people wish you all the best as I do.

    Like

  31. Chris
    June 9, 2016 at 11:43 pm

    J.A.H, PhD, MPH: “You won’t put in a comment the URLs for the articles you base your claim to want to help people because you don’t want to open yourself to ridicule.”

    I linked to the paper that was actually referenced in the paperwork when my son had a genetic screen for his heart disorder. I was hoping Patrick would actually click on it and read it (by the way, it does include some mitochondrial sequences, the whole paper is actually free to read online). It seems he did not get the big friendly hint that there is actual factual scientific literature about the sequences that are actually shared with the patients. Plus it is not a secret.

    What Patrick failed to understand, that while they know the genetic sequences associated with the abnormal heart muscle growth for almost 80% of cases, there are still those they have not found. It is my understanding that brains are much more complicated than hearts, so the number of genetic sequences affecting the brain would exponentially larger than HCM.

    The genetics doctor, who works mainly with autism genetics, asked if we would agree to a full genetic screen to see if there was a connection between his neuro and cardiac issues. The problem is that at that time we would have had to pay for it. Well, now they have some funding for a study and really would like him to participate. It includes several MRIs and taking of blood. He declined after seeing the multi-page consent form and reading that they would videotape him. They have been calling him trying to get him to reconsider, he does not need to be videotaped, etc. He is twenty seven years old, it is his decision.

    Like

  32. Anuthosh Mahamati
    June 10, 2016 at 4:32 am

    Here is a link to a short film I made at Film School last year about my experience of Polio in Australia in 1948, and a interview with a neurophysiotherapist who works with Post Polio survivors.

    While I didn’t end up in an iron lung I was hospitalised and rehabilitation institution for much longer, and when eventually I was home I did correspondence school for the first year or so. In the process of making the film last year I sought my hospital records under our Freedom of Information Act, but they did not arrive until the film was finished. It was interesting though how much I had remembered accurately, As I am now 70, there are no relatives alive I could ask to confirm details.

    Sr. Kenny was not accepted in Australia and was much more respected in US. I did not have the hot towel treatment, but a lot of physio. In Australia it seems there were much less surgical interventions to fuse etc.

    Please share the link to others you may know who could be interested.

    Mahamati

    Like

  33. June 10, 2016 at 5:27 am

    Dear Judith,
    I am 73 years old and remember well the polio epidemics of my childhood. Before the vaccine, families lived in fear! I saw children in iron lungs back then. It was horrible! I also had friends that were crippled by the disease. As soon as the vaccine became available, all families stood in long lines to get them, and we thanked God and Dr. Salk for this miracle! You are a very brave woman, Judith! Thank you for posting your story. Praise God that you lived to tell about it! I wish you a long and blessed life from now on. Keep telling your story! It’s the truth!
    Sincerely,
    Judy Eidson

    Like

  34. Patrick
    June 10, 2016 at 10:24 am

    @lawrence

    “No such genetic testing exists, Patrick.”

    Why because you say so? Sorry it does and it is the future of medicine.

    Like

  35. Patrick
    June 10, 2016 at 10:30 am

    @joel

    I don’t believe your supposed credentials for one minute. You can’t even read a comment a few lines long and comprehend it.

    “You won’t put in a comment the URLs for the articles you base your claim to want to help people because you don’t want to open yourself to ridicule?”

    I don’t have articles nor URLS and never said I did.

    And you forgot to tell me how autism is diagnosed. Remember, you said that “autism -like” (autism behavior and development) is not the same as autism.

    Like

  36. June 10, 2016 at 11:55 am

    Thank you all so very much for your comments and insights, and for your compassion.

    Like

  37. Joel A. Harrison, PhD, MPH
    June 10, 2016 at 12:35 pm

    @ Patrick

    You write: “I don’t have articles nor URLS and never said I did.”

    No, you didn’t say you had them; but you make claims and refuse to give your sources, articles, books, websites. As far as I can tell, they may have come from your own delusions.

    What you believe about my credentials is irrelevant given your incredible stupidity. However, even if I didn’t have a single degree, my articles, both in medical journals, for Every Child By Two, and for magazines and newspapers, are all well-documented. I don’t make claims I can’t give several references for. One of the early leaders in Social Psychology, Carolyn Sherif, at U of Oklahoma only had a masters degree; but was respected world-wide for her research. Finally, she went back to school to get her PhD. The courses she had to take were often based on her research.

    I already explained why “autism-like” is not a diagnosis of autism. Hannah Poling was diagnosed by an established respected expert centers and if she fit the criteria for autism spectrum disorders they would have written so. And why has her father refused to release her medical records and forbidden her doctors to be interviewed?

    I am not going to try to explain how autism is diagnosed. Go to your local university library and read the section in the DSM IV revised or the newer DSM V. I didn’t forget, in a comment I am not about to write many pages. Do your own homework. And, since you don’t understand anything, also read some books on how diagnostic tests are developed, including how one establishes reliability and validity.

    Since I doubt you are willing to put in the effort to learn anything, nothing I say or anyone else says will change your mind.

    Like

  38. June 10, 2016 at 12:51 pm

    As a child I too had polio and was in an iron lung, this was in the early 50’s We lived in Los Angeles at the time. I do not remember much of the ordeal as I was so young, but I have seen one or two photos. I was lucky as the only lasting effect for me is that when I am tired, done a lot of walking or am very stressed my right foot turns out-ward and then I will have a slight limp. My right leg is my “weak” leg, I have sprained my ankle badly many times, my hip gives me pain and knee also pains me. But I am thankful that I pulled through and had a pretty normal childhood (at least as far as I can remember 🙂

    Like

  39. Joel A. Harrison, PhD, MPH
    June 10, 2016 at 2:19 pm

    @ Patrick

    What you believe in your delusional world is irrelevant; however, for the other reasonable people following this discussion, see below. Note you can click on the URL and verify it is legitimate, my doctorate was in Educational Psychology, purely research, and I also took all the required courses, practicums, and one-year internship in clinical psychology, then received a 3-year post-doc fellowship from National Institutes of Health, during which I earned an MPH, my first MA was in Social Psychology, a research program. You just continue making a fool of yourself. I fall du inte tror jag kan svenska, jag kan. In case you don’t think I know swedish, I do. Je peut aussi lire français und ich kan auch deutsch lesen.

    Doctoral Theses from University of Gothenburg / Doktorsavhandlingar från Göteborgs universitet >
    Methodological research in process and outcome studies : psychophysiology, systematic desensitization, and dental fear

    Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2077/11496

    Title: 
    Methodological research in process and outcome studies : psychophysiology, systematic desensitization, and dental fear
    Authors: 
    Harrison, Joel Alan
    Issue Date: 
    1983
    University: 
    Göteborgs universitet/University of Gothenburg
    Institution: 
    Pedagogik
    Publication type: 
    Doctoral thesis
    Keywords: 
    Psykologi Fysiologisk Fear
    Psychophysiology
    ISBN: 
    91-7222-584-X
    URI: 
    http://hdl.handle.net/2077/11496
    Appears in Collections:
    Doctoral Theses from University of Gothenburg / Doktorsavhandlingar från Göteborgs universitet

     
    c

    Like

  40. Patrick
    June 10, 2016 at 4:21 pm

    Joel, I don’t believe you. So you can’t tell me how autism is diagnosed? Just what I expected. Since you are too lazy to do your own research, I will tell you. Autism is diagnosed based on behavior and development. If Hannah Poling has “autism-like” behaviors, she would be diagnosed with autism. Period.
    It’s no different than the majority of kids who have “regressive” autism, that actually have toxic-overload, but yet have an autism diagnosis. Why, because they have “autism-like” behaviors.

    Like

  41. Joel A. Harrison, PhD, MPH
    June 10, 2016 at 5:59 pm

    @ Patrick

    You really are an absolute idiot. So, don’t believe me, I guess the following are also wrong; but you are right. Wow! Get back on your meds. And I have books discussing differential diagnosis, but they would be way beyond your abilities to understand. I do want to thank you. I didn’t know the U of Gothenburg posted my doctoral dissertation online. It took me about five minutes to find it. I just went to yahoo.se and typed in the title. Fun to know!

    Everyone else is wrong; but you are right. Autism-like, just as flu-like, means that there is an overlap of some symptoms. Get back on your meds and maybe you will finally understand this. Why do I bother even responding, because, for example, I now have all of the following downloaded and saved for future reference, not because they will have any impact on you. Mig veterligt är du patient på psyket. As far as I know you could be a patient at a mental hospital.

    From Autism Society:

    “Other medical conditions or syndromes, such as sensory processing disorder, can present symptoms that are confusingly similar to autism’s. This is known as differential diagnosis.”
    (http://www.autism-society.org/what-is/diagnosis/)

    In blue in the middle of the page you can click on “differential diagnosis” and it gives a number of conditions

    And from WebMD (http://www.webmd.com/brain/autism/other-conditions-with-symptoms-similar-to-autism)

    Other Conditions With Symptoms Similar to Autism

    Autism and several other related disorders are grouped under the heading of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), once known as pervasive developmental disorders (PDDs). These disorders all have similar symptoms.
    Also, there are several medical conditions that can be confused with autism because of similar symptoms. Some of these medical conditions can occur along with autism but are not classified as ASDs. They include:
    • Intellectual disability. People with severe intellectual disabilities may have many behaviors similar to those of autism but are not necessarily autistic. People who are autistic can also be intellectually disabled.
    • Specific developmental disorders. Some developmental disorders, particularly language disorders, can mimic autism.
    • Schizophrenia. When schizophrenia develops in childhood, which is rare, it can be confused with autism.
    • Selective mutism. In selective mutism, a child is able to speak in some situations but unable to speak (is mute) in others.
    • Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Some children with obsessive-compulsive disorder, like those with autism, have unusual interests and repetitive behaviors. But unlike children with autism, children with OCD are able to develop social and communication skills.
    • Reactive attachment disorder. In this disorder, there is usually a history of severe neglect. Language and social skills usually begin to develop after a child is given love and attention.
    • Avoidant personality disorder. This disorder is characterized by anxiety in dealing with social situations.
    Specific diagnostic guidelines are used to distinguish autism from other conditions.1 Although other ASDs and certain medical conditions share some symptoms, they do not meet all of the diagnostic criteria for autism.

    Citations
    1 American Psychiatric Association (2013). Neurodevelopmental disorders. In Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th ed., pp. 31-86. Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Association.

    Liked by 1 person

  42. Joel A. Harrison, PhD, MPH
    June 10, 2016 at 6:00 pm

    @ Patrick

    Apparently comments can only be so long, so, some more:

    And from Autism FAQ – Similar Conditions (http://www.autism-resources.com/autismfaq-simi.html )

    “There are a number of diseases which cause children to display some of the symptoms of autism. Also, on occasion, brain injury has caused people to display some of the symptoms of autism”

    And perfect for you: Conditions that Resemble Autism for Dummies (http://www.dummies.com/how-to/content/conditions-that-resemble-autism.html)

    Conditions That Resemble Autism
    By Stephen Shore and Linda G. Rastelli from Understanding Autism For Dummies
    Because doctors can’t definitively, precisely diagnose autism, they encounter several other conditions and symptoms that tend to enter the diagnostic mix. This mixture makes awareness of conditions with related or similar symptoms important. Read on to see a rundown of conditions and symptoms and appear to be like autism.
    If a doctor diagnoses a child with some variant of autism spectrum disorder, the need for immediate intervention is the same. Such a diagnosis means that the child doesn’t fit the clinical criteria for an autism diagnosis, and it doesn’t address the severity of the symptoms that are present. You know whether or not your child needs help. And don’t worry too much about the diagnosis, itself; instead do what your child needs and find out what help is available to him or her.
    Childhood Disintegrative Disorder
    Although not much is known about Childhood Disintegrative Disorder, children with this condition develop normally until they reach 3 to 4 years of age (rarely do children show change later than this, although some children develop this disorder as late as 10 years). At that point, they undergo a quick regression (faster than children with regressive-onset autism), usually losing all language ability and in some cases losing bowel and bladder control. In a show of other symptoms, the children can have epileptic seizures, for which anticonvulsive drugs are often helpful, and motor disorders, probably caused by acute sensory processing problems.
    The National Institute of Health considers Childhood Disintegrative Disorder part of the grouping of Pervasive Developmental Disorders, but the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention disagrees. At any rate, Childhood Disintegrative Disorder is quite rare, and because they experience such a late onset of symptoms, these children require a very thorough medical workup. However, the individual treatment for these kids can be almost identical to treatment of autism.
    Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder
    Many children who exhibit more severe cases of Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder, or AD/HD, often share many of the characteristics and features with children at the high-functioning/Asperger’s end of the autism spectrum — particularly in the areas of communication, social integration, and behavior. Some children get diagnosed with one of the disorders and then receive the other diagnosis at a later time.
    Symptoms for both autism and AD/HD include problems with organization, sensory issues, attention, and social skills. However, the delay in acquiring language that occurs with more severe autism isn’t consistent with AD/HD.
    What you (and your doctors) should keep in mind is that the two disorders are frequently confused because of their overlapping behavioral symptoms. Also, hyperactivity doesn’t always equal AD/HD. It can be part of many other childhood developmental problems.
    The implication for parents is to know your child well and to make sure you get a second opinion with your child’s diagnosis. AD/HD in schools is treated differently than autism: Although the disorder is considered a disability under the Americans with Disabilities Act, schools usually offer a different set of accommodations than they do for children on the autism spectrum.
    Other possible diagnoses
    Science has come a long way from the time when autism was confused with deafness or mental retardation, but not that far. Don’t misunderstand: Some of the alternative diagnoses may be correct; that is, they may be present in addition to autism. However, a diagnosis of autism may better explain a person’s symptoms than any of the psychological categories he or she can fall into when autism isn’t a suspect.
    Sometimes people who are aggressive or seem resistant to authority are given a psychological diagnosis such as oppositional defiant disorder, conduct disorder, or borderline personality disorder. Bipolar disorder and depression are other diagnoses sometimes given to people who should be diagnosed with autism, which does lend itself to mood disorders. Obsessive compulsive disorder is also easily diagnosed in autistic children. A child may have any of these disorders in addition to autism, but autism should be considered the primary problem. You should press your doctors to investigate further if you aren’t satisfied with the diagnosis or if your child doesn’t improve after some rounds of medication.
    Other syndromes that may look a bit like autism, but definitely aren’t autism, include the following (Note: Some of these syndromes may occur with autism or be mistaken for autism; people can have more than one disorder at a time):
    • Cornelia DeLange Syndrome
    • Tourette’s Syndrome
    • Fragile X Syndrome
    • William’s Syndrome
    • Down’s Syndrome
    • Landau-Kleffner Syndrome
    Article ID = 321986 Article Title = Conditions That Resemble Autism

    Like

  43. Joel A. Harrison, PhD, MPH
    June 10, 2016 at 6:04 pm

    @ Patrick

    What a stupid thing to say, “Autism is diagnosed based on behavior and development.”

    Golly gee, that could be said about many conditions. How about some specifics? For instance, “The Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule–Generic:
    A Standard Measure of Social and Communication Deficits
    Associated with the Spectrum of Autism” or

    Koegel, L.K., Koegel, R.L., & Smith, A. (1997). Variables related to differences in standardized test
    outcomes for children with ASD. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 27, 233-243.
    Lord, C., Rutter, M., DiLavore, P.C. & Risi, S. (2000). Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule
    (ADOS). Los Angeles: Western Psychological Services.
    Roid, G.H. & Miller, L.J. (1997). The Leiter International Performance Scale- Revised Edition. Lutz,
    Florida: Psychological Assessment Resources.
    Watson, L.R. & Marcus, L.M. (1995). Diagnosis and assessment of preschool children. In E.
    Schopler & G.B. Mesibov (Eds.). Diagnosis and assessment in ASD. (pp.271-301). New York:
    Plenum Press.

    Like

  44. June 10, 2016 at 8:54 pm

    I was with you in August,1949, age 6, but my hospital was in Wisconsin. I remember my bed between two iron lungs, though I was never in one. I had some of the same operations as you had. I couldn’t see my parents for perhaps two weeks and the plastic toys I received went through a sterilizer. I thought they were used toys from my friends, yet happy to have them. So much more that was the same and different than your experience. And I am as horrified as you about the anti-immunization groups. I talked recently to my best friend at the time. She said her daughter was having a hard time finding a pre-school for her grandchild that had at least a 90% immunization rate. When will they ever learn?

    Like

  45. Margaret Gibb
    June 11, 2016 at 8:19 am

    All I can say is I had polio aged 8 months.Polio left me with a paralysed arm, shoulder and left foot and scoliosis of the spine this has affected me all my life.However I did not let it define my life and I worked married and had children. I would never have put my children at risk of getting this or any other disease when there is something in place to prevent it and my children were given the appropriate vaccinations. To me not getting your child vaccinated is like putting them into a room full of wild animals and children and hoping your child is not the one that is attacked!.
    I would urge anyone advocating not having their child vaccinated to look at old films taken during the polio epidemics,look at children in iron lungs,look at children wearing iron and metal on their legs,backs and chests and say you are not going to protect your children against this!

    Like

  46. Joel A. Harrison, PhD, MPH
    June 11, 2016 at 11:12 am

    CORRECTION:

    I have repeatedly used the phrase “autism-like” which I have seen so many times it must have just overwhelmed my usual caution, so I didn’t bother to check the actual wording. So, below is from the actual court document. I give two URLs, but it is up on several more websites. Note, the phrase used is “demonstrated features of autism disorder.” I won’t go point by point through them; but if you go to the DSM V (Autism Speaks at: https://www.autismspeaks.org/what-autism/diagnosis/dsm-5-diagnostic-criteria CDC at: http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/autism/hcp-dsm.html), carefully look at ALL the criteria required for a diagnosis of autism and read the findings in the case, it is obvious why experts, at a center dedicated to autism and related disorders, Center for Autism and Related Disorders (“CARDS”), chose not to give an autism diagnosis.

    However, whether the case stated “autism-like” or “features of autism disorder” still clearly means she fulfilled some of the criteria; but not all. As I wrote in a previous comment, flu-like or features of flu could represent a number of quite different causes. Just to give an absurd example, imagine a kid just had his temperature taken and it was 101 or, perhaps, 102. If it were flu season, would you suspect the flu? What if I told you he had just come from a picnic and several of the kids now were vomiting? Or what if I told you I took his temperature just after he finished playing a soccer match in 90 degree weather? Add one more symptom, then two, etc. and slowly you will narrow the possibilities. However, even if you eliminate everything except a microbe, still doesn’t mean he has the flu, even if it is flu season. He could have another viral infection or bacterial or even a fungus or protozoa.

    Note also that the Court clearly stated the vaccine was not related to the complex seizure disorder; but “significantly aggravated an underlying mitochondrial disorder.” Note also that the Doctor, an expert at a Center specializing in Autism, explained “that children with biochemical profiles similar to CHILD’s develop normally until sometime between the first and second year of life when their metabolic pattern becomes apparent, at which time they developmentally regress.”

    So, exactly as I explained in previous comments, the ruling was based on one of four possible findings when investigating vaccines, that it “predisposed”, brought about a condition that was inevitable. At worst, in the Hannah Poling case, it might have hastened by a few months to, perhaps, a year the inevitable and, then again, without the vaccines, the very next day she could have experienced any of a number of natural microbes that would have taxed her mitochondrial system far more than killed and weakened vaccines.

    And, even if one were to make the case, ignoring the actual Court finding, that Hannah had autism, it would change little. Despite what Patrick claims and continues to refuse to give even one reference, testing for genetic disorders is costly and only a few types of mitochondrial disorders can be found. See Patrick F. Chinnery (last updated August 14, 2014) . Mitochondrial Disorders Overview. NCBI Bookshelf. Available at: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK1224/?report=printable

    If all parents opted to test their children it would cost a fortune, insurance rates would go through the roof. If, however, parents decided instead to delay vaccinating their children, at first they would be protected by most children being vaccinated, though not completely; but as more and more did not vaccinate, diseases that are prevalent and highly contagious, just a plane-flight away, would certainly lead to ever larger outbreaks in the US. Not only would this lead to suffering, hospitalizations, disabilities, and even deaths, drive up our already enormous health care expenditures, lead to lost schooling and lost wages from parents having to stay home with a sick kid; but for those with a mitochondrial disorder, one would expect the worst.

    Just one more thing: Patrick accused me: “you are too lazy to do your own research, I will tell you. Autism is diagnosed based on behavior and development.”

    As anyone can see from my comments, I list a number of actual papers and have and have read many more. Anyone without reading, researching anything could make such a meaningless statement as “Autism is diagnosed based on behavior and development.” Actually, when suspected, genetic tests are also performed since autism spectrum disorders include some genetic conditions; but the question is what behaviors are used and how they are observed (how long, what situations), and what developmental aspects are looked at and how are they evaluated. Gee, how do doctors evaluate a patient’s condition? Patrick would answer, based on his immense research and knowledge: “By questioning the patient and doing an exam.” So glad he has done so much research, I never would have thought of that.

    COURT DOCUMENT ON HANNAH POLING:

    Available at: http://www.ageofautism.com/2008/02/full-text-autis.html
    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/david-kirby/the-vaccineautism-court-d_b_88558.html

    The clinicians concluded that CHILD was developmentally delayed and demonstrated features of autistic disorder.

    Dr. Kelley affirmed that CHILD’s history and lab results were consistent with “an etiologically unexplained metabolic disorder that appear[ed] to be a common cause of developmental regression.” Id. at 7. He continued to note that children with biochemical profiles similar to CHILD’s develop normally until sometime between the first and second year of life when their metabolic pattern becomes apparent, at which time they developmentally regress. Id. Dr. Kelley described this
    condition as “mitochondrial PPD.”

    In sum, DVIC has concluded that the facts of this case meet the statutory criteria for demonstrating that the vaccinations CHILD received on July 19, 2000, significantly aggravated an underlying mitochondrial disorder, which predisposed her to deficits in cellular energy metabolism, and manifested as a regressive encephalopathy with features of autism spectrum disorder. Therefore, respondent recommends that compensation be awarded to petitioners in accordance with 42 U.S.C. § 300aa-11(c)(1)(C)(ii).

    DVIC has concluded that CHILD’s complex partial seizure disorder, with an onset of almost six years after her July 19, 2000 vaccinations, is not related to a vaccine-injury.

    Like

  47. Joel A. Harrison, PhD, MPH
    June 11, 2016 at 11:13 am

    CORRECTION:

    I have repeatedly used the phrase “autism-like” which I have seen so many times it must have just overwhelmed my usual caution, so I didn’t bother to check the actual wording. So, below is from the actual court document. I give two URLs, but it is up on several more websites. Note, the phrase used is “demonstrated features of autism disorder.” I won’t go point by point through them; but if you go to the DSM V (Autism Speaks at: https://www.autismspeaks.org/what-autism/diagnosis/dsm-5-diagnostic-criteria CDC at: http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/autism/hcp-dsm.html), carefully look at ALL the criteria required for a diagnosis of autism and read the findings in the case, it is obvious why experts, at a center dedicated to autism and related disorders, Center for Autism and Related Disorders (“CARDS”), chose not to give an autism diagnosis.

    However, whether the case stated “autism-like” or “features of autism disorder” still clearly means she fulfilled some of the criteria; but not all. As I wrote in a previous comment, flu-like or features of flu could represent a number of quite different causes. Just to give an absurd example, imagine a kid just had his temperature taken and it was 101 or, perhaps, 102. If it were flu season, would you suspect the flu? What if I told you he had just come from a picnic and several of the kids now were vomiting? Or what if I told you I took his temperature just after he finished playing a soccer match in 90 degree weather? Add one more symptom, then two, etc. and slowly you will narrow the possibilities. However, even if you eliminate everything except a microbe, still doesn’t mean he has the flu, even if it is flu season. He could have another viral infection or bacterial or even a fungus or protozoa.

    Note also that the Court clearly stated the vaccine was not related to the complex seizure disorder; but “significantly aggravated an underlying mitochondrial disorder.” Note also that the Doctor, an expert at a Center specializing in Autism, explained “that children with biochemical profiles similar to CHILD’s develop normally until sometime between the first and second year of life when their metabolic pattern becomes apparent, at which time they developmentally regress.”

    So, exactly as I explained in previous comments, the ruling was based on one of four possible findings when investigating vaccines, that it “predisposed”, brought about a condition that was inevitable. At worst, in the Hannah Poling case, it might have hastened by a few months to, perhaps, a year the inevitable and, then again, without the vaccines, the very next day she could have experienced any of a number of natural microbes that would have taxed her mitochondrial system far more than killed and weakened vaccines.

    And, even if one were to make the case, ignoring the actual Court finding, that Hannah had autism, it would change little. Despite what Patrick claims and continues to refuse to give even one reference, testing for genetic disorders is costly and only a few types of mitochondrial disorders can be found. See Patrick F. Chinnery (last updated August 14, 2014) . Mitochondrial Disorders Overview. NCBI Bookshelf. Available at: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK1224/?report=printable

    If all parents opted to test their children it would cost a fortune, insurance rates would go through the roof. If, however, parents decided instead to delay vaccinating their children, at first they would be protected by most children being vaccinated, though not completely; but as more and more did not vaccinate, diseases that are prevalent and highly contagious, just a plane-flight away, would certainly lead to ever larger outbreaks in the US. Not only would this lead to suffering, hospitalizations, disabilities, and even deaths, drive up our already enormous health care expenditures, lead to lost schooling and lost wages from parents having to stay home with a sick kid; but for those with a mitochondrial disorder, one would expect the worst.

    Just one more thing: Patrick accused me: “you are too lazy to do your own research, I will tell you. Autism is diagnosed based on behavior and development.”

    As anyone can see from my comments, I list a number of actual papers and have and have read many more. Anyone without reading, researching anything could make such a meaningless statement as “Autism is diagnosed based on behavior and development.” Actually, when suspected, genetic tests are also performed since autism spectrum disorders include some genetic conditions; but the question is what behaviors are used and how they are observed (how long, what situations), and what developmental aspects are looked at and how are they evaluated. Gee, how do doctors evaluate a patient’s condition? Patrick would answer, based on his immense research and knowledge: “By questioning the patient and doing an exam.” So glad he has done so much research, I never would have thought of that.

    This blog limits space, so Court document in next comment

    Liked by 1 person

  48. Joel A. Harrison, PhD, MPH
    June 11, 2016 at 11:14 am

    COURT DOCUMENT ON HANNAH POLING:

    Available at: http://www.ageofautism.com/2008/02/full-text-autis.html
    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/david-kirby/the-vaccineautism-court-d_b_88558.html

    The clinicians concluded that CHILD was developmentally delayed and demonstrated features of autistic disorder.

    Dr. Kelley affirmed that CHILD’s history and lab results were consistent with “an etiologically unexplained metabolic disorder that appear[ed] to be a common cause of developmental regression.” Id. at 7. He continued to note that children with biochemical profiles similar to CHILD’s develop normally until sometime between the first and second year of life when their metabolic pattern becomes apparent, at which time they developmentally regress. Id. Dr. Kelley described this
    condition as “mitochondrial PPD.”

    In sum, DVIC has concluded that the facts of this case meet the statutory criteria for demonstrating that the vaccinations CHILD received on July 19, 2000, significantly aggravated an underlying mitochondrial disorder, which predisposed her to deficits in cellular energy metabolism, and manifested as a regressive encephalopathy with features of autism spectrum disorder. Therefore, respondent recommends that compensation be awarded to petitioners in accordance with 42 U.S.C. § 300aa-11(c)(1)(C)(ii).

    DVIC has concluded that CHILD’s complex partial seizure disorder, with an onset of almost six years after her July 19, 2000 vaccinations, is not related to a vaccine-injury.

    Like

  49. June 12, 2016 at 5:22 am

    My children with ASD had autism before they were ever vaccinated. I’ve had people get upset when I told them that and one actually asked me to stop telling people. And some egnore my families experence and keep going on about the harms of vaccinations. It seems in many cases it’s become a matter of pride. They get to a point of “no return” in a way. It’s hard for folks to admit they were wrong or duped.

    Like

  50. David M
    June 12, 2016 at 2:34 pm

    This is an excellent resource as a personal account of polio and the polio vaccination. It is not an account of the Pertussis vaccination. All vaccinations are not the same, each should be evaluated individually.

    Like

  51. Wendy Daniel
    June 12, 2016 at 7:49 pm

    Childhood illness is always traumatic and no-one would wish this on any child. However I think it likely, in view of what I have read, that your illness was actually caused by DDT poisoning. The graphs tracing the incidence of ‘polio’ (a summer disease from when they sprayed the orchards etc) and DDT production track in very similar paths.

    @ Polio: watch Dr Suzanne Humphries speaking on polio on Utube. (Clip attached)

    Much of the sickness that was called polio in the past was actually DDT, lead or arsenic poisoning. Often aggravated by sugar consumption and fluctuating blood sugar levels. Children who had had their tonsils out (very common) were six times more likely to contract bulbar polio. They sprayed kids in public pools and beaches with DDT. You could buy DDT impregnated wallpaper and people even put DDT on their kids’ sandwiches. Also, people got govt allowances in the US for ‘polio’ so they called everything polio.

    Much of the paralysis was due to the fact that they treated children by IMMOBILISING them for months. Sister Kenny from Australia got a lot of kids well very quickly by relaxing, massaging, manipulation and exercising the limbs. They even made a feature film about her championed by and featuring Rosalind Russell.

    After the polio vaccine they didn’t call things polio any more. It was acute flaccid paralysis, transverse myelitis, encephalitis or Guillaine Barre syndrome.
    I this is what nearly 50,000 children in India have now as a result of receiving the vaccine. Because they have been vaccinated they don’t call it Polio any more but they are getting sick in greater numbers

    In the 1948 North Carolina epidemic Dr Fred Klenner cured 60 out of 60 cases of polio with VITAMIN C (ascorbic acid) injected in massive doses every two hours. They were all clinically well again within 72 hours. Even the lung based cases they have paraded in front of us all these years to instil fear.

    Dr Suzanne Humphries book, Dissolving Illusions has great info, is easy to read and I has lots of amazing quotes. A real history lesson.

    Like

  52. Gray Falcon
    June 12, 2016 at 8:11 pm

    Wendy- Any contemporary sources for your claims?

    Like

  53. Joel A. Harrison, PhD, MPH
    June 12, 2016 at 10:45 pm

    @ Wendy

    I’ve seen Humphrey’s graph of the years of DDT and it is inaccurate. Acute flaccid paralysis does apply to more than just polio; but how do you explain the numbers of acute flaccid paralysis cases going from an average of 15,000 or more per year to less than a 1,000 in a few years to less than a 100 a few years later following the introduction of the polio vaccine? If polio was caused by DDT, then, since DDT continued to be used in the US in vast quantities until 1970, 15 years after start of mass vaccinations, the vaccine should not have had any effect. Maybe they could have hidden a few cases; but not 15,000, especially kids in iron lungs. No, maybe some individual idiot put DDT on their kids sandwich; but it was not policy. I plan on writing an article for Every Child By Two about polio and polio vaccine; but it won’t be ready for many months.

    I’ve not only seen Humphrey’s presentations; but read her book and she is just plain wrong.

    As for Sister Kenny, yes, she pushed for exercise and physiotherapy and yes, many kids were helped; but Sister Kenny’s help did not bring an end to paralyzed kids, there were still many thousands following introduction and acceptance of her approach. And she has been criticized for being too rigid in her approach, something that many people who succeed in something often suffer from, arrogance that their approach is the only one. There are a lot of good books on history of polio, start with Pulitzer Prize winner “Polio: An American Story” available at your local library.

    You write: “In the 1948 North Carolina epidemic Dr Fred Klenner cured 60 out of 60 cases of polio with VITAMIN C (ascorbic acid) injected in massive doses every two hours. They were all clinically well again within 72 hours.” But Humphrey claims that most cases of polio were misdiagnosed. It wasn’t until 1951 that they started applying a consistent diagnosis and had lab tests to confirm, so, the alleged 60 out of 60 probably didn’t have polio or had mild cases that would have resolved on their own (keep in mind that only 1 out of 100 actually became paralyzed) and you live in a fantasy world if you believe anything for a serious condition would have a 100% cure rate. In addition, such high doses of vitamin c can have serious side-effects. It is an acid and has to be filtered by the kidneys.

    Keep believing in your world of fantasy. By the way, the first polio epidemics, going back to the 1890s in Sweden were a half century before the mass introduction of DDT and in places where cases of lead and arsenic poisoning did not occur.

    As for “You could buy DDT impregnated wallpaper.” DDT is being used in the Third World, sprayed on walls in huts to combat malaria and, yet, no polio in the countries where the vaccine has been employed. And there will always be a few cases of acute flaccid paralysis from other causes; but we now have lab tests that can be applied to check if it is polio or something else..

    I just love how people without any real understanding of science listen and/or read from one or a few sources and, if it suits their paranoid belief system, think it true, while the works of 1,000s of scientists all over the world are discounted.

    As for “I this is what nearly 50,000 children in India have now as a result of receiving the vaccine.” A few years ago, two Indian doctors in an obscure journal, the Indian Journal of Medical Ethics, reported that cases of acute flaccid paralysis had been detected by the WHO in rural areas where they were vaccinating. The problem is that these were rural areas never before served by any public health and the WHO as part of their polio vaccine program began surveillance, so no record prior to WHO of how many cases of paralysis there were. Labs did find some of the cases were echo virus, related to polio; but NOT polio. The surveillance teams were picking up cases at the same time they began vaccinating. Think about it? And the two doctors who wrote the article weren’t there, weren’t infectious diseases specialists and it was a bit bizarre to report an infection in some obscure journal. And the numbers weren’t even close to 50,000 or even 1,000. By the way, India reports now five polio-free years and they do labs on cases of acute flaccid paralysis. If there were large numbers of cases of paralysis, they wouldn’t be able to hide them. India actually has a lively free press.

    I could go on and on; but Humphrey’s book was painful to read. I could and probably eventually will tear it apart page by page. Keep in mind that she now promotes homeopathy. Do you know what homeopathy is? They take one part of some substance, then dilute it with 10 parts of water, then dilute it again and again, 28 times in all. Experts no longer can find a trace of the substance, so they claim water has memory. Yikes! And Humphrey’s believes in it. Well, I used to believe in Santa Claus and the Easter Bunny; but I grew up. And she also pushes complementary and alternative approaches to medicine, naturopathy, that have little to no scientific research.

    As for the movies about Sister Kenny, do you really believe Hollywood movies don’t exaggerate, don’t take license? By the way, the Sister Kenny Foundation pushes vaccination.

    As for “people got govt allowances in the US for ‘polio’ so they called everything polio.” Yep, kid is in iron lung and diagnosed with polio because government paid for it. Get real!

    Liked by 2 people

  54. June 12, 2016 at 11:35 pm

    I’m confused by your reference to Sister Kenny. I had paralytic polio and was treated with hot packs and exercise. Was this not an appropriate approach? (I still have paralysis in one foot and one knee, but I don’t know if it would have been worse w/o the treatment.)

    Like

  55. Joel A. Harrison, PhD, MPH
    June 13, 2016 at 12:50 am

    @ Carol

    Yes, it was an appropriate approach. The question is how fast and how much you were pushed to exercise which would be impossible to determine at this time. Probably you received a completely appropriate treatment as, from your description, you are doing reasonably well. Sister Kenny is responsible for the change in approach to treating polio, a change that was highly successful, that improved the lives of many. In fact, in the 1950s she was considered a hero. And, yes,you probably would have been worse without treatment. You seem to think I see things in black and white, which I don’t. Too little of a good thing or too much of a good thing can pose problems. There is actually a new book on Sister Kenny that I’ve been meaning to get; but I’m so far behind in my reading that it will have to wait: Naomi Rogers “Polio Wars: Sister Kenny and the Golden Age of American Medicine.” I’ve read an earlier book by Rogers “Dirt and Disease: Polio Before FDR” which was excellent. When I get around to the book, hopefully it will give more information about Kenny than that given in other books about polio since the entire book focuses on her. The main point that I was making was Wendy’s claim that she got lots of kids well. Depends on your definition of well; but most got better, improved; but most also did not get “well” just as you unfortunately still have paralysis in one foot and one knee. Wendy’s comment just displays someone who doesn’t know what they are talking about; but can parrot what someone else has said. I doubt if she even knows the difference between acute flaccid paralysis, guillaine barré, and transverse myelitis. Nor would I guess that she knows what a differential diagnosis is and that with it one can distinguish in most cases between the three.

    I do sincerely hope that, despite your problems, you have had a good life and continue to do so. As I mentioned in a previous comment, I have personally known a number of people who had various degrees of problems from polio, from approximately how you describe your situation to quadriplegic; but able to breath, to 30+ years in an iron lung. From what I learned, all, except the one in the iron lung, had received treatment based on Sister Kenny. Not all became well.

    Like

  56. Chris
    June 13, 2016 at 2:01 am

    Ms. Buske: “Was this not an appropriate approach?”

    What I believe the short answer to this is “prevention is better than treatment.” In the long run it is cheaper and better to prevent a disease than having to treat it with lots and lots of respiratory and physical therapy.

    Like

  57. June 13, 2016 at 3:53 am

    Chris – Why did you say that? I am strongly pro-vaccination, but that was not an option in 1949. I’m understanding more now about the title of this blog – An inconvenient truth – due to the barbed comments made throughout the site. Joel – thank you for your good wishes. To all – please remember you are writing to people with feelings. Ridicule and demeaning comments add pain to those already hurting.

    Like

  58. Chris
    June 13, 2016 at 10:26 am

    I am sorry, I was trying to interpret what Joel was saying. My apologies.

    Like

  59. June 13, 2016 at 10:57 am

    I want to thank all of you for your comments. I am disappointed but not surprised at the portrayal of Suzanne Humphries as being some kind of authority on vaccines. She lacks credibility because of her exaggerated and misleading claims, presumably to promote her book. Like Sherri Tenpenny, Andrew Wakefield, Mike Adams and other medical frauds, she is making a living promoting an agenda full of wrong information. These people are predators who prey on the uninformed and uneducated. The claim by one commenter here that I got polio from DDT is, quite simply, a lie.

    Liked by 3 people

  60. Candy Swift
    June 14, 2016 at 10:20 pm

    This is kind of similar to what Creative Biolabs is insisting on. “I share my personal story in hopes that it will encourage polio vaccination and support of polio eradication.” Yes, you made it.

    Like

  61. June 27, 2016 at 9:11 pm

    Judith thank you for your courageous story. I had an aunt who contracted polio as a girl. I was always amazed at how she got around on her brace and cane. It must have been really hard, but she was able to get around. I appreciate your sharing your struggles and your advocacy for immunizations so no other children go through what you and my aunt went through. Thank you again. (Incidentally, I was born in Stamford and grew up in Norwalk. I didn’t know polio was so nearby where I had my childhood.)

    Like

  62. robert schiessl
    July 3, 2016 at 3:09 pm

    Thank you for your story. It is almost the same as mine. I do remember the play ground and watching the kids play, I was very lonely and lived in my head.I would be a great basketball player or what ever.One of these days I will tell my story. I am a man 74 years old.robert schiessl nebraska

    Like

  63. Andrea Bell
    July 3, 2016 at 6:23 pm

    Im so sorry that the community of people who don’t wish to be safe and vaccinate are so nasty and mean to you. I really appreciate you sharing your story and your strength! I will keep you in prayer. Please know that those whom persecute you are in your face being mean but, rest assured dear lady your story will help many get vaccinated! Many blessings to you!

    Like

  64. Margaret Graham
    July 4, 2016 at 3:17 pm

    Such a powerful story. My mother contracted infantile paralysis in the 1920’s and would sometimes talk about her multiple hospitalizations, my grandmother picking her up at the hospital for occassional home visits, needing to carry her on her back up the subway stairs because the steps up to the EL (elevated train) were to hard to navigate with the braces and crutches. She went on to get married, raise 6 children and lived a full life, but in her 60s, she again experienced weakness in her legs as post-polio syndrome eroded her ability to walk. Yet, she only showed strength to us, her children, as she struggled to maintain her independence, a lesson we all carry with us to this day. Your story is very dear to us, and we thank you for sharing your vulnerability, contributing an important point of view to this debate.

    Liked by 1 person

  65. Mary
    July 6, 2016 at 9:10 pm

    I did not read all the comments but it seems that a common theme to most of the pro-vaxx comments is that the anti-vaxx side fears having these diseases injected into their children because of the disease. I did not see in any of the comments that I read any reference to the toxins, metals and chemicals that are used in the making, binding and dispensing of said vaccines. These toxins and chemicals attack the brain as is proven by the fact that in the selling of homes a purchaser must be given a pamphlet to read that tells of the hazards of exposure/ingestion of lead. Women when pregnant are told to stay away from fish because of the mercury. It is harmful for the baby. They are told to avoid this, stop that, etc…for the sake of the baby’s health. Then the very moment the baby is born modern medicine starts shooting baby up with substances containing aluminum, mercury, lead and whatever else the vaccines contain. Why not just eat fish while pregnant. If it is not harmful to shoot mercury directly into your child where it is probably doing more damage that eating fish since the placenta helps filter out bad some of the bad things, go ahead and eat fish. For the woman who’s baby could not have gotten autism or ASD from vaccines because the child has been like that from the start, let me just ask, did you have a flu vaccine while pregnant? Did you have your baby in America? If your child was born in the states, did you refuse the Vit. K and Hep. B vaccines? If your child was born in the US and you did not refuse vaccine then your child was vaccinated before you even held him/her. So you argument does not hold water.

    As far as sanitary conditions go, you may know yourself to be a clean person and to have good hygienic habits but you have no idea what is on someone else’s hands. If you don’t wash your store bought produce before as soon as you bring it home the germs it carries are multiplying all over your hands and in turn spreading rotavirus and influenza to name a few. If you don’t believe me just check it out on the food safety websites.

    Like

  66. Chris
    July 6, 2016 at 9:21 pm

    Mary, please post the PubMed indexed studies by reputable qualified researchers that show the present American IPV vaccine causes more harm than polio. Also, please tell us exactly how much lead, aluminum and mercury is in that particular vaccine. Be sure to provide verifiable documentation.

    “As far as sanitary conditions go, you may know yourself to be a clean person and to have good hygienic habits but you have no idea what is on someone else’s hands.”

    In an ironic twist, polio caused more injury after sanitation improved. Apparently before there was treated water and sewage treatment, almost every baby was infected with polio at a time they were protected by their mother’s immunity. Then that stopped happening, and it infected later in life when it caused lots of problems. Hence the invention of the iron lung.

    So, Mary, how many kids do you know need to live with artificial respiration and leg splints these days?

    Here is a book suggestion for you: Polio: An American Story by David M. Oshinsky

    Like

  67. Chris
    July 6, 2016 at 9:38 pm

    Mary, I just happened to have a certain webpage open in a tab. It starts with these words:

    Deaths from infectious diseases have declined markedly in the United States during the 20th century (Figure 1). This decline contributed to a sharp drop in infant and child mortality (1,2) and to the 29.2-year increase in life expectancy (2). In 1900, 30.4% of all deaths occurred among children aged less than 5 years; in 1997, that percentage was only 1.4%.

    So, why would we want to go back to 1900?

    Like

  68. July 7, 2016 at 12:43 am

    My family pediatrician, Princeton-educated Merrit Low, got polio from a patient as a young doctor. He recovered, but wore a brace and used crutches or a wheelchair all his life. He was an excellent physician, later becoming President of the American Association of Pediatricians. I recall a summer when we were ‘quarrantined’ at a summer house and couldn’t go to the beach, for fear of getting polio, probably 1954 or 55. When the vaccine became available my parents were very excited and couldn’t wait for us to get it. I recall a shot, but later oral boosters. My great-uncle also had it as a child and had a deformed leg all his life as a result. We are lucky this is not a threat now.

    Liked by 1 person

  69. jgc56
    July 8, 2016 at 6:57 pm

    RE: Suzanne Humphries, when I’m looking for someone to base an argument of authority around I know my first stop is the Encyclopedia of American Loons (Humphries entry is # 783).

    Like

  70. February 21, 2017 at 9:53 pm

    Hi Judith, such a touching story! I am a chemist and doing some analytical chemical research everyday. I work with some pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies, so I hope I can help some patients who is suffering from pain.

    Like

  71. May 16, 2017 at 2:56 am

    Hello, my mother is a polio survivor. I’m 52 years old. As a young girl getting ready for school one of my happiest memories was getting my polio vaccine along with my brother. I remember looking at my mom and she smiled almost with promising eyes that she knew we would never experience the pain she experienced and saw her friends die from. Thank you for sharing your story.

    Like

  1. No trackbacks yet.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: