Home > Parent Perspective, Testimonials, Vaccine Myths > Mommy Bloggers “Babble” About Vaccine Myths (Part 1)

Mommy Bloggers “Babble” About Vaccine Myths (Part 1)

In the past few days I’ve been reflecting on several articles about childhood vaccination that have been written from various parent perspectives.  Since I also write from a parent perspective, on a blog that is entirely dedicated to immunization issues, it is intriguing to see this topic generating such diverse discussions on prominent mommy forums such as Babble.  The fact is, when it comes to vaccines, there are about as many opinions on the subject as there are parents. 
Unfortunately, the majority of mommy bloggers avoid topics like immunization for the simple fact that these discussions tend to elicit strong personal convictions that lead to a slew of heated exchanges.  No matter what is said, or where someone stands on the issue, there is bound to be harsh criticism. 
Because of this, I want to first applaud each of these writers for openly sharing their perspective. Over the course of the next few days, I will attempt to highlight several of the articles that have caught my attention. Of course, I expect that my interpretations will be different from yours, and so I encourage everyone to read these post for themselves and then come back to share your responses with us here on Shot of Prevention.
     

The Worst Myths About Unvaccinated Kids

This is the article that first sparked my interest. Ironically, the title was reworked to read the “The Worst Things People Say About Unvaccinated Kids”, along with the an editor’s note which explained, “The title of this post has been changed and the word “myth” has been removed to emphasize that this post is the opinion of the blogger.”)

While I suppose the editor’s note was added to soften the blow of criticism, in this article Kate Tiejte lists  five “myths” she takes offense to regarding her choice not to vaccinate her children. For each myth, she personally responds in an attempt to argue her reasoning for not vaccinating.

As someone who is privy to these debates all day long on both this blog and the Vaccinate Your Baby Facebook page, I have to admit that I wasn’t as surprised by her list, as I was by her responses.   While Katie appears to be referencing real-life dialogue, it seems that her content was derived from conversations with people who aren’t very articulate in the matters of immunizations.

For instance, her first complaint is in comments such as “You better keep your unvaccinated kid away from mine because I don’t want mine to get sick!” She responds that in order for her child to get another sick, they would have to actually be sick. While I agree and can’t imagine anyone would argue that fact, I do see how she could misinterpret the concern that parents of vaccinated children have when encountering unvaccinated children.

Those who are well-versed in matters of immunizations are probably aware of research that shows unvaccinated children to be more likely to fall ill with a vaccine preventable disease than a vaccinated child.  Additionally, most educated vaccine advocates acknowledge that vaccines have their limitations and they are not 100% effective, in 100% of the population, 100% of the time.  However, a vaccine not given is 100% not effective and parental concerns center around the fact that a vaccinated child may fall ill and a non-vaccinated child is more likely to get a vaccine preventable disease.

Even if the author chooses not to accept this information, the point that needs to be emphasized is that we are not just talking about being sick, as in the case of the common cold.  Most vaccine preventable diseases are fairly serious for children, often resulting in medical complications, hospitalization and sometimes even death. (These are the exact risks  that are evaluated by the experts, and the reasons why a vaccine is ultimately recommended.)  What’s even more concerning to most vaccine advocates is that the infants and children too  young to be vaccinated, as well as some individuals who are unable to be vaccinated due to various medical conditions, rely on the protection of others in the community.  The concern here is that if more and more parents choose not to vaccinate, then we will see an increase in the amount of disease circulating, which can directly impact the health and well-being of all children – both vaccinated and unvaccinated. (Yes, I worry about Katie’s children as well as my own.)

While I agree with Katie when she says “unvaccinated children aren’t magical disease-carriers,” I have to disagree with her assessment that “many are rarely sick. If they are they’ll stay home!”

I only wish these statements were true.  While I most certainly keep my kids home when I know they are sick, as Katie most certainly does, neither of us can control the actions of other parents who choose to send their kids to school sick.  And how about the incidences when a child is contagious before the onset of symptoms?   And what about the sick children who visit the doctor for diagnosis or treatment?  If a child visits the doctor with a case of a vaccine preventable disease, they can be spreading their illness to others in the waiting room.  (There are documented cases of this, where a non-vaccinated child contracts a vaccine preventable disease and then infects other children both in school and in the doctor’s office. This is not a myth, but a real life scenario.)

Another problem for Katie is when others suggest that children should be vaccinated “for the greater good”.  While it is understandable that she may only be concerned with her own child, she claims that she would only agree to vaccinate if there is “absolutely no harm to my child, guaranteed”.  Unfortunately, what she fails to acknowledge is that every parental choice is a matter of risk assessment and that no one can offer her any guarantees.

First instance, how is she guaranteed that her child won’t actually catch a disease?  If they did, could anyone possibly guarantee that it would result in absolutely no harm to her child?  Perhaps she fails to recognize that her own decision not to vaccinate her children poses it’s own set of risks.  (Risks that, thankfully for her children, are significantly reduced by the fact that the majority of people in this country DO vaccinate, which helps prevent the overall incidence of disease.)

I don’t know of anyone who doesn’t understand that vaccines carry risks.  By law, information regarding these risks are distributed to a parent whenever a child is vaccinated.  However, the risks and benefits of the vaccines and the disease are both taken into account before a vaccine recommendation is even made.  What would be helpful, is if parents took these assessments into consideration when making a choice whether to vaccinate or not.

The most alarming statement in the article was regarding the suggestion that Your child will die of measles or another preventable illness!”   While I can imagine others trying to elicit fear, her response to this statement is somewhat concerning.  She explains that this is unlikely because “The primary reason for complications/death from measles, according to the WHO is vitamin A deficiency.  She goes on to say that if she discovered her children where deficient, she could simply supplement with vitamins.

While I’ll agree that a healthy diet, rest and exercise can strengthen an immune system, it’s impressive that she feels she would be able to predict when her children might need a supplement.  However, the bigger concern is what supplements she believes could ward off other vaccine preventable diseases like meningitis, pneumonia, or pertussis.    

She concludes with the myth that “If you don’t vaccinate, your kid can’t go to school!” Again, I’m not quite sure who she has been talking to, but if she cares to join the conversation at the Vaccinate Your Baby Facebook page, she will quickly realize that educated vaccine advocates are fully aware of the medical, religious and philosophical exemptions that exist in various states.  In fact, even those that favor vaccines often debate this subject, questioning whether exemptions shouldn’t be more difficult to get, or debating what kind of documentation should be required.  There are even some people who believe personal/philosophical exemptions shouldn’t exist and others who feel that schools should make their exemptions public so that parents can be aware of the risks to their children while attending schools.

While I am grateful that this author has brought up the conversation about vaccines, I am saddened that she has limited her exposure to forums in which the participants are not able to clearly express their concerns with her decision in a way that she understands.  It may not change her mind, but at least she might like to know that parents who vaccinate don’t all respond in the five ways she outlined.  Perhaps, if we continue to keep the conversation going, we can all gain a better understanding of what prompts parental vaccination decisions.

I know this article provided me with a bit of insight into Katie’s decision.  What about you?  I’m curious to know, what are your impressions of the article?  What were you surprised to learn?  How did this author’s perspective make you feel? Add your comments here and check back tomorrow when I highlight another mommy blogger’s perspective.

  1. KoryO
    July 20, 2011 at 7:40 am

    Ol’ Kate is already notorious for her earlier post this year about why she loves her son more than her daughter (son was born via VBAC.) She milked that for all it was worth so now she’s found another way to get attention, apparently.

    Like

  2. Karen
    July 20, 2011 at 7:40 am

    Thank you for this post. The “Five Myths” article needed a public response to correct its misinformation. Excellent work!

    Like

  3. Karen
    July 20, 2011 at 7:42 am

    Why would she say such a thing in a public, permanent forum? Her children are going to learn to read some day!

    Like

  4. Katie
    July 20, 2011 at 8:19 am

    Obviously many people asked her that very question, and her response was basically that everyone else loves one child more than another, and if you say otherwise, you’re a psychopathic liar. Of course, the post and the comments have been so butchered by Babble to cover Kate’s ass that it’s hard to get what really went down on that post.

    Like

  5. Alternative Mom
    July 20, 2011 at 9:20 am

    “Most vaccine preventable diseases are fairly serious for children, often resulting in medical complications, hospitalization and sometimes even death…”

    Unfortunately, this can be said for vaccines as well. To deny there serious complications (neurological mainly) and/or death from some vaccinations is to deny truth and reality.

    One size does NOT fit all!

    My main problem with the vaccine recommendations is that there is obviously a subset of individuals that have adverse reactions to vaccines (if they didn’t the CDC and the FDA wouldn’t have come up with the adverse reaction reporting network – VAERS http://vaers.hhs.gov/index). How are those individuals identified before injection? There may be genuine allergies to some of the ingredients, but the newborn/baby/child isn’t checked for that prior to being vaccinated…

    If there was a test to determine those specifics, then I would be more inclined to vaccinate (if my child wasn’t an allergic one). Also, I have never been given the package insert or informed of what is in each vaccine when we go to the doc. I’ve had to ask for it (I still have the vitamin K they wanted to give my baby – only .05% vitamin K and the rest are chemicals) and find out whats in them via the CDCs website.

    I am one that keeps her child home when ill, but this year we will be homeschooling so that is a non-issue.

    Also, I didn’t know pneumonia was vaccine preventable, which vaccine does this? I’ll have to look that up.

    I wish there could be a real discussion about this topic, because I think a lot can be learned from both sides. Instead there is usually a lot of disrespect, attacking, and down-right rudeness. Us “anti-vaxers” have real concerns that seriously need to be addressed before we will “change our position”.

    P.S. We do care about your children, and we also care about ours…

    Like

  6. July 20, 2011 at 9:42 am

    I saw this post on another friend’s page who also strongly believes in vaccinations because she herself has a weakened immune system so I want to share my 20 month old son’s story. His body, his immune system is so weak, it cannot handle the vaccine. We have to rely on the general public to get their children vaccinated for his SURVIVAL. So when you Moms who don’t believe in vaccinations continue to skip them and deny that the measles returning are of some other creation, I want you to think of the little boy in my picture who may die because of your opinion, despite the fact that medicine, science and experts all strongly disagree with how you are raising your children. You can spew your media spun crap, which many people do to make themselves feel better, but lets be honest- this is about control. You don’t want someone else telling you how to raise your child and I get it, but you have to look broader. There are children out there who just cannot survive an outbreak, or a simple cold. Unfortunately, my son is one of those right now- we hope and pray everyday his immune system will grow stronger but until then, as a Mom to other Moms, my son’s life is in your hands. Think about him and all the other kids who you effect, whether directly or indirectly. You are playing God.

    Like

  7. July 20, 2011 at 9:47 am

    Just for accuracy sake- Kate’s daughter wasn’t born by c-section. She had a difficult hospital birth including several interventions, and an epidural (after desiring a natural, unmedicated birth). Sounds like she had trouble reconciling what happened during her baby’s delivery with what she hoped would happen. Her second baby was born at home and she is planning on having a homebirth with this pregnancy as well. She has written about it extensively on Babble. Just wanted to clarify for accuracy sake.

    Like

  8. Christine Vara
    July 20, 2011 at 9:52 am

    Alternative Mom – I wouldn’t say that anyone is denying that serious complications can occur as a result of vaccination. Again, that is exactly why parents are to be given information regarding vaccine risks at the time of vaccination. I happen to have five children and due to several military moves for our family we have seen many different doctors. I have always received information regarding their vaccines. I’m glad to see that you have referenced this information on the CDC website, but perhaps you should be questioning your doctor about the fact that you never received this information.

    While it would be ideal if there were some reliable way to determine whether a child would have an adverse reaction prior to administering the vaccine, I wonder how costly, accurate and/or invasive it would be? I’m guessing that given the small percentage of adverse reactions to vaccines that it has not been considered feasible, but then again, I would have to refer to an immunization specialist for the answer to that question.

    In regards to homeschooling, that does not make vaccination a non-issue for others, just yourself. I have plenty of friends and neighbors who homeschool their kids. These kids play with mine, go out in public places, visit family and friends and even occassionally go to the doctor. Illnesses are spread throughout our communities in a variety of ways, not just at school. Some people just feel that if parents have the right to file exemptions for their kids to attend public school, then they also should have the right to know how many children in their child’s class are not vaccinated. Also, we must acknowledge that the work that public health officials do to contain outbreaks (like the current measles outbreaks we are seeing) is costly to the public at large and could arguably be reduced if more people were vaccinated.

    I hope this helps to explain some of our differences. I’m glad to hear that you care about my children. I hope that one day you will understand how I feel that your choice in not vaccinating can potentially impact their health.

    Like

  9. Alternative Mom
    July 20, 2011 at 10:02 am

    Thanks Christine for your response. It is much appreciated. I should back up in saying that we never got anything from the ped. That’s not so, what I was given was a photocopy sheet of the benefits of vaccination. I didn’t get a list of what was in each vaccine and the adverse reactions to it.

    I don’t think it would “cost to much” to determine this subset, and I think it would be a worthwhile cost in the long run(whatever it is) if it would increase the number of people that would vaccinate.

    I’m not sure if the percentage of adverse reactions is so small… I’m not sure what it is, but it’s not that small… Check the website – that data scared the crap out of me.

    Like

  10. Emma
    July 20, 2011 at 10:08 am

    unfortunately other peoples children are not something most non-vaccinating parents care about. They are doing what they think is best for their own child and don’t consider public health and children like this. To them it’s not their problem or their responsibility.

    Like

  11. Alternative Mom
    July 20, 2011 at 10:08 am

    Sorry Theresa, I don’t play God, which is why I don’t interfere with the natural processess that the body needs to go through…

    I liked Christine’s response, she was very diplomatic, yours is not so nice. You should think about how you address folks especially when you feel your sons life is in other people’s hands… duh…

    Yes, it is about control and no I don’t want someone else telling me how to raise my children. Wouldn’t you agree that you take this same position? Would you want me telling you to keep your boy in the house until he is well instead of subjecting him to unknown elements? I didn’t think so…

    Until you can play nice, don’t respond to me or I will play by your rules…

    Like

  12. Nathan
    July 20, 2011 at 10:10 am

    Alternative Mom,

    “Most vaccine preventable diseases are fairly serious for children, often resulting in medical complications, hospitalization and sometimes even death…”
    Unfortunately, this can be said for vaccines as well. To deny there serious complications (neurological mainly) and/or death from some vaccinations is to deny truth and reality.

    No one here denies that. But you are ignoring the amount of risk. The risk of say, a neurological compication from measles vaccine is one or more thousand times the risk of neurologic complication from measles itself. To deny that is to deny truth and reality as well.

    My main problem with the vaccine recommendations is that there is obviously a subset of individuals that have adverse reactions to vaccines (if they didn’t the CDC and the FDA wouldn’t have come up with the adverse reaction reporting network – VAERS http://vaers.hhs.gov/index). How are those individuals identified before injection? There may be genuine allergies to some of the ingredients, but the newborn/baby/child isn’t checked for that prior to being vaccinated…

    I agree, that would be wonderful, and some day it might be possible. It is not right now. But the reality is that in the absence of that knowledge, it is far safer to be vaccinated, because the chance of an adverse event from the disease is so much greater than the chance of an adverse event from the vaccine.

    Consider: peanut allergy is dangerous and possibly lethal, and far more common than a vaccine allergy. Yet we do not test every child for peanut allergy before exposure to peanuts, nor to a battery of tests for other foods that they could be allergic to before we allow them to eat. And vaccines are far more beneficial than peanuts.

    I am one that keeps her child home when ill, but this year we will be homeschooling so that is a non-issue.

    Unless you are planning on keeping your child in quarantine for the year, I’m afraid it is still an issue. You will undoubtedly have your child around other people, and many diseases are contagious before they make you ill.

    Also, I didn’t know pneumonia was vaccine preventable, which vaccine does this? I’ll have to look that up.

    Hib and pneumococcus are bacteria that cause pneumonia for which there are vaccines.

    I wish there could be a real discussion about this topic, because I think a lot can be learned from both sides. Instead there is usually a lot of disrespect, attacking, and down-right rudeness. Us “anti-vaxers” have real concerns that seriously need to be addressed before we will “change our position”.

    And there is a lot of the same towards vaccine advocates who also have real concerns about the damage of the antivaccine movement to public health. Recently a regular contributor to Age of Autism wrote about how he wanted God to smite people who advocate for vaccination. I try to ignore that stuff and look to the substance of the argument. But I have not found the actual arguments of the antivaccine movment to be substantive.

    I apologize for my redundancy, as Christine addressed most of this already – I did write it prior to seeing her post.

    Like

  13. Erika
    July 20, 2011 at 10:19 am

    Anti-vaxxers will never understand how it affects other peoples sick or weakend kids until they have one of their own. That’s the only way they would ever see the seriousness of the situation and realize the dangers to kids like mine or your friend’s, Theresa.

    Like

  14. Nathan
    July 20, 2011 at 10:35 am

    I’m not sure if the percentage of adverse reactions is so small… I’m not sure what it is, but it’s not that small… Check the website – that data scared the crap out of me.

    I have visited VAERS many times. If it scared the crap out of you, AM, then it is probably because you are confusing something that happened after a vaccination with something that actually happened

    because of

    a vaccination. VAERS is a database for recording things that happen after vaccination, so that scientists can figure out what things to investigate or study to find out if it is causative. For the vast majority of concerns about the adverse events of vaccines, it is found through research that they do not have a causative relationship.

    The risks from vaccines are, indeed “that small.” Here is a page that gives some examples of the risk of the disease vs. the risk of the vaccine.

    http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/vac-gen/6mishome.htm#risk

    Like

  15. Alternative Mom
    July 20, 2011 at 10:35 am

    “Anti-vaxxers will never understand how it affects other peoples sick or weakend kids until they have one of their own. That’s the only way they would ever see the seriousness of the situation and realize the dangers to kids like mine or your friend’s, Theresa.”

    Erika, there are parents of vaccine injured children that feel the EXACT same way you feel.

    We do understand your concern… Do you understand ours?

    Like

  16. Nathan
    July 20, 2011 at 10:36 am

    Sorry – “because of” should have been in italics.

    Like

  17. Alternative Mom
    July 20, 2011 at 10:37 am

    And since vaccines are NOT 100% effective, how do you handle this? You do know that children that HAVE been vaccinated against certain diseases still get them… (pertussis and measles) and it’s also been suggested that those that are vaccinated are actually carrying and shedding the viruses/bacterias that they were injected with.

    Like

  18. Nathan
    July 20, 2011 at 10:38 am

    It does not appear that Theresa was actually responding to you, AM.

    Like

  19. Kelly
    July 20, 2011 at 10:49 am

    The thing to remember with VAERS is that it is only a reporting system to record events that happened after vaccination. This system only indicates correlation. Further investigation of these reports have not shown causation. The lack of causation is the important point not the number of VAERS reports.

    Like

  20. Nathan
    July 20, 2011 at 10:50 am

    Because, as I said above, it is about relative risk. Vaccines are not 100% effective, but massively reduce your chance of getting and spreading the diseases.

    it’s also been suggested that those that are vaccinated are actually carrying and shedding the viruses/bacterias that they were injected with.

    I’m sure it has. Lots of things are “suggested” on antivaccine sites. That does not make them true.

    Some live vaccines can shed, such as rotavirus and nasal influenza, but they do so a whole lot less than if you got the disease, and they don’t shed the actual virus but an attenuated strain. The biggest risk from that is that you might get boosted immunity from the shedding exposure, but not the disease, unless you are severely immunocompromised. But the thing about that is that the severly immunocompromised are the ones who most benefit from the herd immunity brought on by vaccines. They are much more at risk from the wild virus than from vaccine shedding.

    Vaccines that are not live (including all bacterial vaccines such as pertussis, which only contain fragments of the bacteria called antigens) do not shed.

    Like

  21. Erika
    July 20, 2011 at 10:54 am

    Yes I do understand that, but I also understand that a lot of parents wrongly claim their children are injured by vaccines, therefore I don’t put a lot of stock into someone that throws VAERS around like it’s proof of anything.

    Like

  22. Erika
    July 20, 2011 at 11:03 am

    I handle this by vaxxing and making sure my kid is surrounded by other chikdren that are vaccinated. Because he is high risk I have to be extra careful with him even though he is fully vaxxed for his age. He is in a school that requires all students be vaxxed and I’m fortunate to be surrounded by friends and family who vaccinate as well.

    Like

  23. Alternative Mom
    July 20, 2011 at 11:08 am

    Erika :Yes I do understand that, but I also understand that a lot of parents wrongly claim their children are injured by vaccines, therefore I don’t put a lot of stock into someone that throws VAERS around like it’s proof of anything.

    +

    Karen, that’s understood… I know that they (FDA) did use information from VAERS to investigate the Rotavirus vaccine and the yellow fever vaccine. I do understand it’s just reporting and nothing else…

    Erika, don’t put any stock in me, I’m not asking you to. VAERS is proof that sometimes things go wrong after a vaccination (which is then left to analysis). Some parents aren’t lying… Why would they?

    This conversation is draining… Everyone’s right and everyone’s wrong… Nobody’s right, and nobody’s wrong!

    Please continue to vaccinate your children.

    Like

  24. Kelly
    July 20, 2011 at 11:12 am

    This response and your choice of screen name tells me that the reason you don’t vaccinate is not about concerns about safety but rather your desire to do things your own way. Is my impression correct? And if so, why do you pretend otherwise?

    Like

  25. Erika
    July 20, 2011 at 11:17 am

    sometimes, as in extremely rare. That is a chance I am willing to take to protect my child. If vaccines cause so many problems, why wasn’t my son injured considering his health risks? I would think that would make him more likely to suffer a vaccine-related injury, but he is just fine. Yet I am supposed to believe a completely healthy kid all of a sudden became autistic or developed a neurological disorder after a vaccine? Especially when it has been proven there is no link between them. No one is saying there aren’t risks with vaccines, but those risks are miniscule compared to the benefits they offer.

    Like

  26. Nathan
    July 20, 2011 at 11:19 am

    Some parents aren’t lying… Why would they?
    She didn’t say anyone was lying. But many people (not all) wrongly claim vaccine injury because they are mistaken, but believe they are right. The key is figuring out what the true rate of severe vaccine reactions is, through studies. It is extremely low.

    Everyone’s right and everyone’s wrong… Nobody’s right, and nobody’s wrong!

    Not really. Ours is the evidence based position held by the overwhelming evidence and medical consensus. Your questions have been answered, and politely I might add. If you feel we are wrong, then you should present evidence that consists of more than a link to VAERS. The evidence that exists overwhelmingly shows that vaccination is wise for everyone without a known medical contraindication.

    Please do not continue to not vaccinate your children, unless a qualified medical professional tells you otherwise.

    Like

  27. Kelly
    July 20, 2011 at 11:35 am

    AM, you still don’t seem to understand the purpose of VAERS. If we had a reporting system for adverse events after eating oatmeal for breakfast and some parents reported that their kid scraped their knee after breakfast or they were in a car accident, would you say that eating oatmeal caused those things? Vaccination is a very notable event in a child’s life and it is very easy to falsely blame the vaccines. There were over 5,000 parents that blame their child’s autism on vaccines. The science is pretty clear that vaccines don’t cause autism but these parents still say their children were harmed. For that reason I don’t put a lot of stock in parents who claim their child was vaccine-injured. The injuries caused by the diseases are real and much better documented.

    Unfortunately there is only 1 right side to this discussion. What is exhausting is explaining the falsehoods of the anti-vaccine position over and over again. I do it in hopes that at least one parent will understand why entertaining a non-vaccinating position is dangerous advice.

    Like

  28. July 20, 2011 at 3:19 pm

    First rule in communication is there is no tone, and I wasn’t responding directly to you, but to the great blog above. I was trying to appeal my side to all those who read it- and from the response I see above, several posters got it, understood what I was trying to convey. This isn’t just about your child. I do nothing with my child that would harm yours or other children. Choosing not to vaccinate is a serious decision that can kill other children,it is quite serious. This generation of non “vaccinators” has blood on their hands and that does include you. So I do believe you are playing God.

    Like

  29. KoryO
    July 20, 2011 at 3:54 pm

    Yeah, right, AM. She’s telling you how your idiotic actions put others at risk….and you whine about how she’s not playing nice and being considerate of your feeewings? You sure don’t care about others’ feelings. It’s a two way street.

    And yeah….frankly, I don’t care about your feelings. I care more about the people who you are putting at risk.

    Which reminds me….gotta call my legislators to see if there is any hope of that measure that would stick you and your type with criminal liability if someone like Theresa’s kid gets sick might make it through this session. Every measles outbreak that happens makes it more and more likely that some legislature WILL pass something like that. The responsible among us are sick and tired of you and your ilk putting others at risk. I’m hoping my state is the first one to do it.

    Until you grow up and realize that not only do you have rights, but you also have liabilities when your thoughtless, selfish actions hurt someone….then please, by all means, contribute.

    Theresa, I hope and pray your son gets better and stronger soon, and that narcissistic, scientifically illiterate people like AM don’t put him at risk.

    Like

  30. Simon Arthur
    July 22, 2011 at 11:46 pm

    I think it is very important to vaccinate treating children against preventable diseases because these diseases can seriously kill people or cause severe complications. And by not vaccinating your children you are puting other children at risk. Maybe you should give children a choice on whether they want to get vaccinated.

    Like

  31. Chris
    July 23, 2011 at 3:51 pm

    Maybe you should give children a choice on whether they want to get vaccinated.

    Have you ever tried to have a meaningful conversation with a child under the age of two? Or even under the age of eight?

    My kids were all able to have an intelligent conversation, and knew the importance of vaccines by the time they were ten years old. That is far past the time that pertussis, rotavirus, Hib, etc. are extremely dangerous.

    Like

  32. Sy
    May 1, 2012 at 11:20 pm


    This is a video on how getting vaccinated definitely is worth the risk

    Like

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