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Posts Tagged ‘vaccine hesitancy’

Rise in Vaccine Hesitancy Related to Pursuit of Purity: A Conversation with Professor Larson

This article was originally published in Horizon magazine by Gary Finnegan. It is being republished  to provide much needed perspective on the issues pertaining to vaccine hesitancy around the world.

 

The rise of alternative health practices and a quest for purity can partly explain the falling confidence in vaccines which is driving outbreaks of preventable diseases such as measles, according to Heidi Larson, professor of anthropology, risk and decision medicine at the UK’s London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine. She is working to understand the causes of vaccine hesitancy in order to devise ways of rebuilding trust.

Why would people opt out of recommended vaccines?

‘Most people have their recommended vaccines but many do not. In some cases, people are missing out on immunisation because they cannot access vaccines. But there is a growing and concerning trend that shows people with access and education are saying “no thanks”. This is a real challenge because it’s driven by belief and it’s difficult to change people’s minds when they have decided that they don’t want or need a vaccine.’

Our 2016 study in 67 countries found that Europe was the most sceptical region in the world.

Heidi Larson, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, UK 

What are the specific reasons people give when declining to immunise their child?

‘Sometimes there are concerns about vaccine ingredients, usually based on a misinterpretation of the science. There is misinformation circulating online about, for example, some compounds that contain metals. But there are also strong underlying beliefs linked to religion, philosophy and politics. In the US, some states allow philosophical exemptions from mandatory vaccination – although California repealed this opt-out option after a major measles outbreak in Disneyland.

‘One of the biggest lessons of our research is that you can never assume what’s in people’s mind nor assume that simply explaining science can change their opinion. People’s reasons for rejecting vaccines could stem from a bad experience at a healthcare facility, general distrust in the government, in medicine or in industry – it’s a real mix but you have to understand their reasons if you are to address concerns and prevent outbreaks of preventable disease.’

How is the decision to vaccinate political?

‘Vaccines are regulated, recommended and sometimes mandated by government or public authorities. In the US, researchers have looked at values-based vaccine rejection. Two major values can be seen: purity and liberty. For some, the idea of government influence over health is unacceptable.’

People need more support to maintain confidence in vaccines, says Dr Heidi Larson. Image credit - Jon Spaull

People need more support to maintain confidence in vaccines, says Dr Heidi Larson. Image credit – Jon Spaull

Do all countries and cultures share the same concerns about vaccines?

‘Ten years ago, the answer was no. We saw distinctions between the UK, where a (now withdrawn) 1998 research paper incorrectly linked the MMR (measles, mumps and rubella) vaccine and autism, and France, whose main vaccine concern was suspected – albeit unproven – links between Hepatitis B vaccines and multiple sclerosis. The UK public was generally not worried about Hepatitis B and the French public was unconcerned about MMR. Now, because information is shared rapidly online and online translation tools are freely available, rumours and myths spread more quickly.’

Does the public expect medicines and vaccines to carry zero risks?

‘Vaccines are different from medicines – they are preventative and given to healthy people. If you are sick, your attitude to intervention and risk is much different. In addition, vaccines are often recommended for people who are most vulnerable – children and pregnant women. Vaccination is, by its nature, somewhat invasive as most vaccines are given by injection, and this provokes an emotional reaction such as fear and anxiety. Indeed, one of the unhelpful trends we notice is that images of needles are commonly used in media coverage about vaccines – you rarely even see a person in the picture.’

Can information fix ‘fake news’?

‘We will always need public communication, but that alone will not fix things. I’m not a great believer in hitting rumours on the head by myth-busting or debunking falsehoods. We need to be more sophisticated and to build strong transnational networks to pick up rumours and misinformation early and surround them with accurate and positive information in support of vaccination.’

Through your Vaccine Confidence Index, you have surveyed opinion on vaccines in 67 countries. What did you find?

‘We came up with a systematic approach to measuring vaccine hesitancy through repeated global surveys. One of the reasons the issue of vaccine reluctance and refusal has not been addressed in any comprehensive way is that it was seen as complex and too fuzzy to measure. It was written off as “not fact” and perceived to be propagated by those who are ignorant, rather than recognising that, fact-or-not fact, these perceptions impact on vaccine uptake and risk disease outbreaks. Our 2016 study in 67 countries found that Europe was the most sceptical region in the world – France was the least positive about vaccines. Now we are planning to rerun the survey in Europe to see if recent devastating measles outbreaks – which have killed 50 people in Europe (since the beginning of 2016) – may have changed minds.’

There were 1,346 cases of measles in Europe in 2008 and 19,570 cases in 2017. Image credit - Horizon

There were 1,346 cases of measles in Europe in 2008 and 19,570 cases in 2017. Image credit – Horizon

How can this information be used to reduce preventable deaths?

‘First you need to understand what’s driving a decline in vaccination rates and only then can you come up with an appropriate response. The needed intervention will vary depending on whether the problem is vaccine supply or access to vaccines, inadequate awareness of disease risk, concern over vaccine safety risks, including ingredients, or general distrust in authority.’

How can people be persuaded that vaccines are safe and what role can research play?

‘Two of our biggest projects are EU-funded initiatives aimed at understanding drivers of vaccine confidence and developing interventions to build trust. One – EBODAC – focuses on trust building and community engagement around recruiting participants into Ebola vaccine trials in Africa, including investigating the evolution and impacts of negative rumours, such as those that led to the suspension of two Ebola vaccine trials in Ghana.

‘Another is the ADVANCE consortium where we are developing a consistent and coordinated approach to assessing vaccine benefits and risks, including more open and coordinated access to relevant data. For example, if a concern is raised about a particular vaccine, we need to be able to determine whether the rates of a reported adverse event are any different among those who are not vaccinated.’

What is the future of this field?

‘We need to do a better job in schools, helping children to understand essential concepts about how immune systems work to fight disease and how vaccines help build our body’s own protection against infection. Medical school curricula also need to focus more on vaccination, including how to engage with patients who have questions about vaccines.  Health authorities need more capacity to respond to vaccine confidence issues, not just by debunking myths, or just providing facts, but by understanding what is driving the concerns, where they are coming from and surrounding them with positive, informed people. The majority of people still believe in vaccines, but they need more support to sustain their confidence.’

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Vaccine Hesitancy Often Tied to Moral Foundations of Liberty and Purity

December 5, 2017 Leave a comment

What's daddy doing?

We often try to overcome vaccine hesitancy with education, hoping that the scientific evidence will be enough to change people’s minds.  The hope is that if we can just provide people with the facts about the dangers of diseases, and the benefits of vaccines, than they will be encouraged to vaccinate.  But research shows that it’s not that easy, and this may not even be the right approach.

Today, Washington Post reporter, Lena Sun, published an article that explains that vaccine hesitancy is not just an issue of education.  Recent behavioral research suggests that there is often a moral difference between people who accept vaccines and people who refuse them.  The point is that people don’t make decisions based solely on fact.  Rather, parents who are most reluctant to vaccinate appear to be strongly concerned with two powerful moral values that influence their attitudes and judgments: individual liberty and purity.

In this framework, liberty is associated with belief in personal responsibility, freedom, property rights and resistance to state involvement in citizens’ lives, while concerns about purity focus on boundaries and protection from contamination.

One new study out of Emory University, published recently in Nature Human Behaviour, used a social psychology theory known as Moral Foundations Theory to determine the underlying moral values most strongly associated with vaccine-hesitant parents. They assessed the parents’ level of vaccination hesitancy and explored how important different moral values were to them when deciding if something was right or wrong. Their findings correspond with the reasons many vaccine-hesitant parents give for delaying or refusing some vaccines.

Another group of researchers out of Loyola University in Chicago were able to validate these finding, but then went one step further.  They found that purity and liberty values also seem to influence the belief in false or misleading statements that often appear on websites that adamantly oppose vaccines.

In another study recently published in the Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, researchers at the University of Amsterdam and University of Kent explored science skepticism as it relates to various issues such as climate change, vaccination and genetic modification in food.  They determined that “religiosity”, as well as concerns about moral purity, were also a common predictor of vaccine skepticism.

The insight that we get from this type of behavioral research can certainly help us better understand those who are vaccine hesitant.  If we can take the moral foundation concerns and incorporate them into our messaging, we may be able to persuade parents that vaccines do fulfill their desire to maintain both liberty and purity.

As an example, to address the purity concerns, one suggested intervention may be to explain that vaccinating is a way of  boosting a child’s natural defenses against disease and keeping the child “pure of infections”.  Whereas a liberty-oriented message might suggest that vaccines can help parents to take personal control of a child’s health so that they are free to live a happy and healthy life.

While such messaging has yet to be tested, these studies, and others like this, are critical to helping us develop more effective communication, and should be a consideration for all of us who engage with vaccine hesitant parents in the doctor’s office, on the internet or at the playground.

 

Concerned Parents Duped by Deceptive Sound Bites and Junk Science

December 1, 2016 2 comments

One of our priorities on Shot of Prevention blog is to provide accurate, evidence-based immunization information so that people can make educated decisions for themselves and their families.  Unfortunately, people are sometimes duped into believing things that are inaccurate, causing them to question the safety, efficacy or importance of vaccines.  If we are to improve vaccine confidence, than we must work to understand why anti-vaccine messages resonate with people.  In this guest post, we learn more about the research being conducted to help us change the trajectory of the anti-vaccine movement.

Concerned Parents Duped by Deceptive Sound Bites and Junk Science

by Meghan Bridgid Moran, Assistant Professor in the Department of Health, Behavior and Society at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

Any parent voicing even the slightest concern about vaccinating a child is lumped in as a member of an inglorious club: “the anti-vaxx movement.” The news media castigates them, other parents shun them and the medical community can’t understand them.

The reality is more complex.

Sure, a very small percentage of parents refuse all vaccines for their children. And there are people and organizations that flatly and loudly assert, falsely, that vaccines are dangerous. But most parents are simply trying to do what’s best for their children in a world saturated with information and misinformation. They just want to protect their families. These are the people who deserve our sympathy, not our ire.

istock_000045885926_xxxlargeAnti-vaccine messaging—however misguided, however misleading—resonates with them. As a result, an increasingly alarming number of parents are opting out of routine vaccinations for their children. Every day, more kids are being exposed to once-tamed vaccine-preventable diseases like measles and whooping cough.

To understand how concerned parents could be persuaded not to vaccinate their children, a team of researchers at San Diego State University and I conducted a deep dive into 480 anti-vaccine websites to analyze their tactics and assess their methods. The picture that emerged from these sites—from Natural News to Mercola to Think Twice—is at once bracing and informative: Anti-vaccine websites leverage an arsenal of powerful and persuasive tactics to manipulate people into believing vaccines are dangerous.

Predictably, these sites appeal directly to people who are interested in choice, personal freedom and the ability to make their own informed decisions — all valiant ideals. “Natural treatments” and “homeopathic remedies” are held high and offered up as bona fide vaccine alternatives. Yet in the end, these sites betray those who visit them.

Here are a few key findings from our research

Read more…

Physicians Can Help Influence Vaccine Opinions By Engaging Patients on Social Media

September 8, 2016 6 comments

posterDr. John Merrill-Steskal has spent 22 years as a Family Medicine Physician.  He believes that doctors can help promote healthy behaviors by becoming more engaged on social media. Throughout the past year, in an effort to help shape public perception on a variety of medical topics such as vaccines, Dr. Merrill-Steskal has begun hosting a monthly radio show,  blogging at Triple Espresso MD, and contributing guest posts on other blogs such as KevinMD.  We welcome his latest contribution:

Vaccine hesitancy: It’s time to go on offense

by John Merrill-Steskal, MD

The term “vaccine hesitancy” is a relatively recent term in medicine, a term used to describe patients who are worried about the safety, efficacy, or necessity of receiving immunizations. Vaccines are safe and have a proven track record of saving lives. As a result, doctors have been caught somewhat off guard by the notion that anyone would have second thoughts about the benefits of immunization.

Recommendations commonly publicized on how to respond to the vaccine hesitant patient are admirable, and have a calm, respectful tone.  For example, doctors are encouraged to engage patients and respond to their concerns, while giving a clear message to recommend vaccination. Since treating patients disrespectfully or with disdain will only serve to alienate them further, being respectful, calm, and clear in our communication is our best chance at tipping the scales in favor of vaccination

The problem with this approach, however, is that physicians are on the defensive before a discussion even begins. And as in sports, a good defense without an offense will not win the game. Because of where we talk to patients, doctors are at a critical disadvantage: the physical place in which physicians engage patients about vaccines is typically the exam room, and by the time patients have arrived to the clinic they may well have already formed their opinions about vaccines.

As a result, physicians are forced to respond and react to concerns, and must attempt to reclaim ground that has already been lost. In other words, because of the nature of where physicians physically interact with and engage patients, we are by default always on the defensive as we work to dispel myths and misinformation regarding vaccine safety or efficacy.

To make a true difference on vaccine hesitancy, I think doctors must engage patients where the dialog is happening in real time: in the world of social media.

Every day patients acquire information, discuss concerns, and formulate opinions within the realm of social media.  By the time a patient enters the exam room, their mind may already be made up about vaccines. While our discussions with individual patients in exam rooms will always be important, it is becoming equally important for physicians to enter the dialog where it is being created, before the patient arrives at the clinic. Physicians need to pay attention to what patients are talking about on social media, and need to be a part of that dialog.  If we don’t, we will always be on the defensive.

If we are to advance vaccination, physicians must leave the safety of the exam room and meet patients where their opinions are being created.  Start a blog, tweet an opinion grounded in science, or engage patients online; by having a stronger voice in social media, doctors have the opportunity to be more influential in shaping opinions before our patients have become “hesitant“.

It is time to go on the offensive, and is the only way we will win the game.

radio-show-panorama

Dr. Merrill-Steskal is joined by a guest on his monthly radio show.

 

Dr. John Merrill-Steskal has recently been accepted to the 2016 American Academy of Family Physicians Vaccine Science Fellowship, an elite fellowship program which only accepts two providers per year.  We look forward to learning more about his work in the area of immunization education and we suggest readers also check out his other immunization related blog posts such as Past and Present: Rubella and Zika and Can the anti-vaccine movement be convinced with more positive messages?  

You can follow him on Twitter @MerrillSteskal.


Every Child By Two (host of the Shot of Prevention blog) welcomes guest blog posts on a variety of vaccine related issues.  The views and opinions expressed in these guest posts do not necessarily represent the views of the Every Child By Two organization.

A Physician’s Plea to Those Who Don’t Vaccinate

July 14, 2016 14 comments

What value do vaccines have in your life?

Throughout July and August, Shot of Prevention is encouraging people to address this question.  Today’s guest post, by clinical cardiologist Dharmaraj Karthikesan, provides a personal perspective from someone who is genuinely concerned about the health and well-being of people who choose not to vaccinate themselves or their children.  

Photo Of RajHere’s what Dr. Karthikesan has to say:

I’ve heard people say that deaths from preventable diseases are the will of God.  Indeed all men must die, but not all have to die stupid.  I believe ignorance is deadly.  Sadly, it can also be contagious.

My issue resides with people who are opposed to vaccination and recently this issue became very personal. 

See, I have a new nephew in the family.  He lives in another country and so I only get to see him on Skype.  However, his parents were considering a visit and I was really looking forward to seeing him.   But due to the outbreak of diphtheria in Malaysia, where I live, I advised his parents to postpone their visit.  See my nephew hasn’t completed his vaccination schedule and I feared for his health.

My fears are not unfounded. This is the reality we are living in; where our lives are dictated by the decision of others. And every decision not to vaccinate affects the health of others in our community and in our world.

As a doctor, I try to appeal to people’s sense and reason when they tell me that they have decided against vaccinating.  Sometimes that communication fails and so I’ve decided to try to employ one other method.

Instinct.

I ask,

Do you instinctively feel that your child is safe without vaccination? 

Do you instinctively feel secure knowing that your child will recover regardless of the infectious disease that they may contract?

Do you instinctively feel impervious to all manner of infectious disease, even those which are airborne, just because you eat a certain diet or take certain homeopathic remedies?  

If it is difficult to honestly answer these questions affirmatively, then I beg you to consider what I have to say. 

Vaccines are safe.

I state the obvious first. I understand and empathize with those who feel that vaccines are dangerous and those who believe vaccines can be harmful or detrimental to health. Let’s assume that this is true. For a moment, let’s assume they are worse than death, or worse than the defects and disabilities they cause.

Let’s start with polio, which can cause disability and even suffocation if it involves the breathing muscles. Assuming your child recovers from polio, he may never run or play like a normal child. Are you prepared to accept that?

How about diphtheria, which affects your child’s breathing. In severe forms, it can affect the heart and nerves leading to death. Are you willing to take that chance? 

Now how about pertussis, which is known to cause violent, uncontrollable coughing making it extremely difficult for a child to get air into their lungs.  About half of babies who get pertussis need care in the hospital, and 1 out of 100 babies will die.  Is this the kind of suffering you want for your child?

There are serious dangers with all vaccine preventable diseases.  However, vaccines work to prevent infection by developing an immunity that imitates the infection.  This imitation spares one from suffering with severe illness.   Instead, vaccination allows the immune system to develop an arsenal of weapons in the form of’ ‘antibodies’. If your child should ever be exposed to these infections in the future, these antibodies will prevent the infection from spreading to your child by eliminating the threat early and preventing your child from getting sick. It’s quite simple actually.  Once the body knows the ‘enemy’, it is better able to defeat it.

So the question that begs for an answer is this;

Do you want your child to be facing these diseases alone, or do you want a strong arsenal of vaccines helping to form a protective shield?

The choice is yours.  But that’s the problem actually.  Vaccines are a choice and people’s choices are sometimes influenced by inaccurate information.

Doctors don’t make money from selling vaccines.

Read more…

History Is Destined To Repeat Itself With More Measles Outbreaks

March 31, 2016 2 comments

What Have We Learned From Last Year’s Measles Outbreak?

8QgmhZV.jpgLast year the United States experienced a large, multi-state measles outbreak that was largely responsible for 189 measles cases that spread across 24 states and the District of Columbia.  It’s believed that the outbreak started from a traveler who contracted measles overseas and then visited the Disneyland amusement park in California while infectious.  Widespread media coverage of the outbreak helped elevate public concerns related to the dangers of measles infection, the consequences of a growing number of school vaccine exemptions and the risks of disease among those who were too young or medically unable to be vaccinated.

At this time last year, it seemed as though we were experiencing a tipping point; a growing number of people were beginning to realize that vaccine refusal had consequences that could threaten our nation’s public health.  The fact that the personal decisions of a select few people was able to threaten herd immunity and the health of many unsuspecting families and communities was worrisome.

It was believed that more parents (including some who had previously refused vaccines) were seeking and accepting vaccination for their children as a direct result of the outbreak.  However, to determine whether clinicians were experiencing any real or lasting changes in vaccine acceptance, Medscape conducted a survey of vaccine providers to find out.

The survey, conducted in July of 2015, included 1577 physicians, nurse practitioners and physician assistants who worked in pediatrics, family medicine and public health.  Responses confirmed that the measles outbreaks induced more acceptance of the measles vaccine and vaccines in general.  The survey also indicated that, for some parents, a greater acceptance of vaccines was directly related to the fear of the disease, the consequence of being denied admission to schools, daycares or camps, and a greater knowledge about vaccines as a result of more reading on the subject.  However, in some cases there was no change.

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Results of Medscape Survey Conducted in July, 2015

 

Every Child By Two also experienced a heightened amount of interest in the months during and immediately following the outbreak with a record number of inquiries from parents.  Most were asking for information about the dangers of measles infection and for clarification of the MMR (measles, mumps and rubella) vaccine schedule.  There were many parents who were specifically inquiring as to the possiblity of vaccinating their children before the recommended age in order to protect them during the outbreak.  Shot of Prevention blog posts that included content specific to measles infection and MMR vaccination had record numbers of views in the early months of 2015, and personal stories relating to the outbreak, were widely shared on social media.

One story that drew a lot of attention was an open letter by Dr. Tim Jacks, whose two children had to be quarantined after they were both exposed to measles at a Phoenix Children’s Hospital clinic.  His 3-year-old daughter Maggie had a compromised immune system as a result of fighting acute lymphoblastic leukemia (blood cancer), while his 10 month old son Eli had received all his recommended vaccines, but was still too young for his first dose of MMR vaccine.  While neither of his children ended up contracting measles, the frustration he expressed in his letter entitled “To the parent of the unvaccinated child who exposed my family to measles” hit a nerve with a lot of people.

The Focus of Immunization Rates Fades as Cases Dwindle

In reaching out to Dr. Jacks this week, it appears that the attention on vaccinations that was raised during last year’s outbreak appears to have been rather short-lived.  He explained,

“As a pediatrician, I regularly discuss vaccines, exemptions, and last year’s outbreak.  The cold facts and data only reach so many, so my family’s story adds a personal angle to the issue that questioning parents rarely consider.  After the media exposure, many families were aware of our situation.  However today, the measles issue is not on as many people’s minds.  Vaccine exemption is however a hot issue in Arizona.  The Arizona political arena is considering avenues to encourage vaccination and I am hopeful that the coming year will produce progress in that regard.”

Today, a little over a year since the outbreaks began, the good news is that there have only been two reported measles cases so far in 2016.  However, it also appears that history may be destined to repeat itself.

Consider, for example, the reports out just this week about a California charter school student who tested positive for measles after returning home from traveling overseas.  With just 43% of kindergarteners at the Yuba River Charter School being up-to-date on their MMR vaccine, the California Department of Public Health has attempted to prevent a measles outbreak by first closing the school to all students, and then remaining closed to those without a measles vaccine until April 8 as long as no new cases are documented.

Despite overwhelmingly high vaccination rates across the country, with a mere 1.7% national vaccine exemption rate among kindergartener’s for the 2014-2015 school year, and a 90%+ coverage of MMR vaccine among 19-35 month old children, these small pockets of unvaccinated children continue to present a risk of future measles outbreaks. Read more…

Outbreaks Remind Us of Dangers of Disease and Benefits of Vaccines

January 30, 2015 16 comments

Rafiki, the wise old mandrill in Disney’s Lion King movie, made a profound statement that is extremely relevant to the current U.S. measles outbreak that began in Disneyland in December, 2014:

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Yes, the past can hurt.  Infectious diseases have a history of being dangerous and deadly.

All you have to do is look at history to see how many millions of lives have been lost, or how many people have been permanently disabled, by infectious diseases. It’s no small number.  And, there’s a long list of diseases that we can now prevent that have been leading killers in the past.  Today, vaccination greatly reduces disease, disability, death and inequity worldwide.  Vaccines given to infants and young children in the U.S. over the past two decades will prevent 322 million illnesses, 21 million hospitalizations and 732,000 deaths over the course of their lifetimes.  While it’s hard to see what doesn’t occur, the fact remains that vaccines save lives and prevent suffering.

Some people will choose to run from the past.  They’re called vaccine refusers.

No matter how much scientific evidence there is to prove vaccines are responsible for the incredible reduction of disease worldwide, there will always be some people who will run from the truth.  They either debate it, or simply ignore it.  These are the people who purposely refuse vaccines.  Sometimes they focus their efforts on trying to pin every possible ailment known to man (from SIDS, asthma, allergies, autism, etc.) on vaccines.  Other times they focus on the risk associated with vaccines.  In the case of the MMR vaccine, they prefer to focus on the less than a one in one million chance of a serious adverse reaction rather than the fact that one or two of every 1,000 children who have measles will likely die.  What is particularly frustrating is their tendency to ignore the present reality as well as the past.   In cases when the scientific community has investigated their concerns, they ignore the findings because they fail to support their previously held beliefs.

Most people have learned from the past, but remain at risk from those who haven’t.  

Thankfully, the overwhelming majority of people vaccinate.  These are the people who actively try to protect themselves, their families, and others in their community, by contributing to the benefits of herd immunity and trying to reduce the transmission of vaccine preventable diseases.  Unfortunately, the minority can sometimes jeopardize the herd.

Take the Van Tornhout family for instance.  Today mark’s the fifth anniversary of their daughter Callie’s death.  Callie was exposed to pertussis before she was old enough to begin her DTaP (diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis) vaccination series.  Her story was featured on CNN last week, as an example of how concerning the current measles outbreak is.  Unfortunately, there are many children under the age of one who are too young to receive the regularly scheduled MMR (measles, mumps, rubella) vaccine who are at increased risk of complications of measles as a direct result of this outbreak.

Katie and Craig Van Tornhout with their newborn daughter Callie

Katie and Craig Van Tornhout lost their newborn daughter Callie to pertussis.  She was only 38 days old and too young to be vaccinated.

Sadly, the Van Tornhout’s can’t run from the past.  Every day without their daughter Callie is a reminder of why they must continue to educate people on the importance of vaccines.

Stories like Callie’s are shared repeatedly.  On the national news.  On various social media sites.  On websites and blogs.  And even around the family dinner table.  We share these stories so people will realize that these diseases still pose a threat to our children, especially those too young to be fully vaccinated.  Unfortunately, some people remain conflicted about the lessons of the past.  On the one hand, they consider vaccinating to protect themselves and their children from these preventable diseases because they hear stories about children like Callie.  But on the other hand, they’re frightened by prolific misinformation that reinforces their suspicions that vaccines may be harmful.  For fear of making the wrong decision, they fail to make the responsible decision to vaccinate, which then results in a decision which jeopardizes the health of everyone else in their communities.

Today, in honor of Callie’s fifth angel-versary, I urge everyone to do what you can to help ensure no other child dies as a result of a vaccine preventable disease.  Don’t be reluctant to engage in a conversation about vaccines with friends or family.  Don’t refrain from sharing scientifically accurate vaccine information on social media.  Don’t be afraid to ask a non-vaccinator what their objections are.  And please don’t let the past repeat itself.  Sign up to receive notifications from Every Child By Two so you can stay informed of relevant immunization news, now and into the future.