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Comprehensive Vaccine App Available on iPhones and iPads

September 12, 2018 Leave a comment

If you’re looking for a comprehensive source of vaccine information, look no further than The Vaccine Handbook App, now available for Apple iPhones and iPads.  This free downloadable App serves as an enhanced digital version of the new 2018 (7th) edition of The Vaccine Handbook: A Practical Guide for Clinicians.

Dr. Gary Marshall, professor of pediatrics and chief of the Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases at the University of Louisville, first published what the vaccine community refers to as The Purple Book back in 2004.  Each edition of The Vaccine Handbook compiles a wide variety of information on vaccine science, guidance, and practice into one easily accessible user-friendly resource.

purple book

The App, which was first released in 2016 and has been updated annually, contains content from the new 7th edition of the book and has been enhanced in many new ways. The electronic version of The Purple Book is fully searchable, with functionality that includes bookmarking, highlighting, user annotation and active links to content on the Internet. There is also a resource section in the App that complements the book with links to vaccine websites, governmental organizations, manufacturers, and various advocacy groups, including Every Child By Two.

Dr. Marshall elaborates on the intent of the project by saying,

“From the beginning, the purpose of The Purple Book was to distill down the complex world of vaccine science and practice into something that practitioners could use, not just for optimizing implementation, but for deepening their understanding as well. It’s not just a “how to” guide; it’s a “how to and here’s why” book.”

The Purple Book is ideal for pediatricians, family physicians, internists, obstetrician/gynecologists, nurses, nurse practitioners, physician’s assistants, and clinical staff. Additionally, Dr. Marshall believes the publication can also be used as the basis for a vaccine curriculum for students and residents.  It can even be a useful resource to parents and patients. He explains,

“The content is expansive but the language is plain, simple, and accessible. It covers the rationale behind authoritative immunization recommendations as well as the many contingencies encountered in everyday practice. Beyond this, it provides a readable foundation on how vaccines are developed, tested, and licensed; how vaccine policy is made; what constitutes the vaccine safety net; standards and regulations; billing; office logistics; and much more. It can be read cover-to-cover, or section-by-section.”

VaccineAppNavigation

The book is divided into two sections. 

The first section includes, among other things; 

  • basic principles of vaccine immunology;
  • background on vaccine development, infrastructure and policy;
  • vaccination standards;
  • general vaccine recommendations and implementation;
  • vaccination schedules;
  • vaccination in special circumstances;
  • and most importantly, tips on addressing concerns about vaccines.

The second section contains details about every vaccine currently licensed in the United States, as well as; 

  • the burden and epidemiology of the respective diseases,
  • history of the immunization program,
  • vaccine constituents,
  • vaccine efficacy,
  • vaccine safety,
  • and vaccine recommendations.

MaryBeth Koslap-Petraco, Pediatric Nurse Practitioner and Adjunct Clinical Assistant Professor at Stony Brook University School of Nursing, had this to share about her experiences using the App:

 “The App is perfect for accessing vaccine information without having to carry around the book. I was preparing a lecture for school nurses about vaccine hesitancy and I used the app on my phone. It was incredibly quick and easy to locate the information I was looking for in the index and then scroll to the specific pages I needed.  Upon opening the App I found the section buttons right on the first page.  I then went directly to the “Addressing Concerns” section which included information on vaccine refusal, communicating risks and benefits, and other topics related to vaccine concerns.  All of the information I needed, along with a complete list of references, was right in one place. If you’re someone who wants to have a full array of vaccine information at your fingertips, than I highly recommend that you download this App.” 

purplebookimage

 

Dr. Marshall adds,

“I am particularly proud of this iteration of The Purple Book. First, it is dedicated to Dr. Stanley Plotkin, with whom I trained in the 1980s and who stands out as mentor and friend to generations of physicians and scientists. Second, the Foreword was written by the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society, which was founded by Stanley exactly 40 years ago. Finally, PIDS was able, through unrestricted educational funding, to make the app available free of charge to anyone who wants it.”

Download it today and let us know what you think in the comments below.

Rise in Vaccine Hesitancy Related to Pursuit of Purity: A Conversation with Professor Larson

This article was originally published in Horizon magazine by Gary Finnegan. It is being republished  to provide much needed perspective on the issues pertaining to vaccine hesitancy around the world.

 

The rise of alternative health practices and a quest for purity can partly explain the falling confidence in vaccines which is driving outbreaks of preventable diseases such as measles, according to Heidi Larson, professor of anthropology, risk and decision medicine at the UK’s London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine. She is working to understand the causes of vaccine hesitancy in order to devise ways of rebuilding trust.

Why would people opt out of recommended vaccines?

‘Most people have their recommended vaccines but many do not. In some cases, people are missing out on immunisation because they cannot access vaccines. But there is a growing and concerning trend that shows people with access and education are saying “no thanks”. This is a real challenge because it’s driven by belief and it’s difficult to change people’s minds when they have decided that they don’t want or need a vaccine.’

Our 2016 study in 67 countries found that Europe was the most sceptical region in the world.

Heidi Larson, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, UK 

What are the specific reasons people give when declining to immunise their child?

‘Sometimes there are concerns about vaccine ingredients, usually based on a misinterpretation of the science. There is misinformation circulating online about, for example, some compounds that contain metals. But there are also strong underlying beliefs linked to religion, philosophy and politics. In the US, some states allow philosophical exemptions from mandatory vaccination – although California repealed this opt-out option after a major measles outbreak in Disneyland.

‘One of the biggest lessons of our research is that you can never assume what’s in people’s mind nor assume that simply explaining science can change their opinion. People’s reasons for rejecting vaccines could stem from a bad experience at a healthcare facility, general distrust in the government, in medicine or in industry – it’s a real mix but you have to understand their reasons if you are to address concerns and prevent outbreaks of preventable disease.’

How is the decision to vaccinate political?

‘Vaccines are regulated, recommended and sometimes mandated by government or public authorities. In the US, researchers have looked at values-based vaccine rejection. Two major values can be seen: purity and liberty. For some, the idea of government influence over health is unacceptable.’

People need more support to maintain confidence in vaccines, says Dr Heidi Larson. Image credit - Jon Spaull

People need more support to maintain confidence in vaccines, says Dr Heidi Larson. Image credit – Jon Spaull

Do all countries and cultures share the same concerns about vaccines?

‘Ten years ago, the answer was no. We saw distinctions between the UK, where a (now withdrawn) 1998 research paper incorrectly linked the MMR (measles, mumps and rubella) vaccine and autism, and France, whose main vaccine concern was suspected – albeit unproven – links between Hepatitis B vaccines and multiple sclerosis. The UK public was generally not worried about Hepatitis B and the French public was unconcerned about MMR. Now, because information is shared rapidly online and online translation tools are freely available, rumours and myths spread more quickly.’

Does the public expect medicines and vaccines to carry zero risks?

‘Vaccines are different from medicines – they are preventative and given to healthy people. If you are sick, your attitude to intervention and risk is much different. In addition, vaccines are often recommended for people who are most vulnerable – children and pregnant women. Vaccination is, by its nature, somewhat invasive as most vaccines are given by injection, and this provokes an emotional reaction such as fear and anxiety. Indeed, one of the unhelpful trends we notice is that images of needles are commonly used in media coverage about vaccines – you rarely even see a person in the picture.’

Can information fix ‘fake news’?

‘We will always need public communication, but that alone will not fix things. I’m not a great believer in hitting rumours on the head by myth-busting or debunking falsehoods. We need to be more sophisticated and to build strong transnational networks to pick up rumours and misinformation early and surround them with accurate and positive information in support of vaccination.’

Through your Vaccine Confidence Index, you have surveyed opinion on vaccines in 67 countries. What did you find?

‘We came up with a systematic approach to measuring vaccine hesitancy through repeated global surveys. One of the reasons the issue of vaccine reluctance and refusal has not been addressed in any comprehensive way is that it was seen as complex and too fuzzy to measure. It was written off as “not fact” and perceived to be propagated by those who are ignorant, rather than recognising that, fact-or-not fact, these perceptions impact on vaccine uptake and risk disease outbreaks. Our 2016 study in 67 countries found that Europe was the most sceptical region in the world – France was the least positive about vaccines. Now we are planning to rerun the survey in Europe to see if recent devastating measles outbreaks – which have killed 50 people in Europe (since the beginning of 2016) – may have changed minds.’

There were 1,346 cases of measles in Europe in 2008 and 19,570 cases in 2017. Image credit - Horizon

There were 1,346 cases of measles in Europe in 2008 and 19,570 cases in 2017. Image credit – Horizon

How can this information be used to reduce preventable deaths?

‘First you need to understand what’s driving a decline in vaccination rates and only then can you come up with an appropriate response. The needed intervention will vary depending on whether the problem is vaccine supply or access to vaccines, inadequate awareness of disease risk, concern over vaccine safety risks, including ingredients, or general distrust in authority.’

How can people be persuaded that vaccines are safe and what role can research play?

‘Two of our biggest projects are EU-funded initiatives aimed at understanding drivers of vaccine confidence and developing interventions to build trust. One – EBODAC – focuses on trust building and community engagement around recruiting participants into Ebola vaccine trials in Africa, including investigating the evolution and impacts of negative rumours, such as those that led to the suspension of two Ebola vaccine trials in Ghana.

‘Another is the ADVANCE consortium where we are developing a consistent and coordinated approach to assessing vaccine benefits and risks, including more open and coordinated access to relevant data. For example, if a concern is raised about a particular vaccine, we need to be able to determine whether the rates of a reported adverse event are any different among those who are not vaccinated.’

What is the future of this field?

‘We need to do a better job in schools, helping children to understand essential concepts about how immune systems work to fight disease and how vaccines help build our body’s own protection against infection. Medical school curricula also need to focus more on vaccination, including how to engage with patients who have questions about vaccines.  Health authorities need more capacity to respond to vaccine confidence issues, not just by debunking myths, or just providing facts, but by understanding what is driving the concerns, where they are coming from and surrounding them with positive, informed people. The majority of people still believe in vaccines, but they need more support to sustain their confidence.’

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Free Online Course Explains Cells, Immunity and Vaccines

January 4, 2018 1 comment
by Rich Greenaway, Director of Program Operations and Special Projects, Every Child By Two

Often times, the concerns people have about vaccines can be addressed through a better understanding of science.  It begins with a more comprehensive explanation of how the cells in our body work, how viruses can infect us, how our bodies fight off infections, and how vaccines help in that process.

DrJMG passport 2

Fortunately, you don’t have to devote your life to being a doctor or scientist to benefit from an improved understanding of immunology.  While many people strive to better educate themselves on these topics, the challenge is in finding educational resources that are not only accessible to the general public, but are also scientifically accurate and comprehensible for non-scientists.

Now Dr. Jonathan M. Gershoni, a Professor of Molecular Immunology and Virology at Tel Aviv University, has stepped in to help.  

After spending thirty years investigating the immune response towards viruses such as HIV, HCV and SARS CoV, Dr. Gershoni is now offering a free course entitled, Viruses & How to Beat Them: Cells, Immunity, Vaccines.

 

Designed for the general public, the course is offered at no charge, but can also be taken for continuing education credits for a small fee ($49).  The online lectures are offered in English in a video format that is easy to understand. Additional learning materials and a glossary of terms are also available for each section.

The entire course consists of seven lessons which are then subdivided into six to ten sub-lessons, each concluding with a quiz.  Although the course became available in December, new participants can view any of the lectures at their own pace.  Lesson 7 may be of particular interest since it deals specifically with vaccines and how they work.  While the time one invests in this course may vary, it is expected that the course can be completed by committing two to three hours per week over an eight-week period.

At a time when immunization misinformation remains prevalent on the internet, and continues to interfere with the public’s ability to recognize the value of vaccines as a primary means of disease prevention, this class and others from reputable individuals and organizations, can further our mission to ensure that everyone is making well-informed decisions regarding vaccines.

Consider the comments Dr. Jonathan M. Gershoni has received from various experts on what they think about vaccines:

We encourage you to register for the course, share your thoughts about the course if you are taking it, and encourage others to further educate themselves about immunology and virology by signing up today.  Simply click here to get started.

How One Man is Credited With Saving 8 Million Lives a Year  

November 17, 2017 Leave a comment

Saving 8 million lives a year may seem like a stretch, but not for Dr. Maurice Hilleman.

Hilleman_scope2Hailed as one of the world’s greatest scientists, Dr. Hilleman helped develop 9 of the 14 routinely recommended vaccines in the U.S. And in 1957, he was the first person to successfully predict an influenza pandemic when he read of an outbreak occurring in Hong Kong. This led him to develop a vaccine for the U.S. that likely saved hundreds of thousands of lives. His life spanned one of the most productive periods in vaccine innovation, and since Dr. Hilleman was right in the middle of it, his life story is truly inspiring.  Fortunately for science enthusiasts, it is now the focus of a new vaccine-related documentary, HILLEMAN: A Perilous Quest to Save the World’s Children.

Developed as part of the Vaccine Makers Project, produced by Medical History Pictures and sponsored by the Vaccine Education Center at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP), the film includes exclusive interviews with Dr. Hilleman and his peers, rare archival footage, and 3-D animations.

The film is meant to not only introduce Dr. Hilleman and his amazing accomplishments, but to also describe the incredible scientific discovery and effort required to create safe and effective vaccines.

Over the last several months, the film has been shown by institutions such as the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History, the National Foundation for Infectious Diseases, and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. HILLEMAN has also been featured at immunization coalition conferences and national professional meetings, including the American Academy of Pediatrics, National Association of School Nurses, National Science Teachers Association, and National Association of Biology Teachers.

To complement the film, the Vaccine Makers Project has developed comprehensive educational materials for elementary, middle, high school and college students. 

Anitbodies

Educators are encouraged to utilize this flexible curriculum in whole or part to support learning objectives related to infectious diseases, the immune system, and how humans fight disease through technologies such as vaccines.

The Vaccine Makers Project has also collaborated with Families Fighting Flu (FFF) to present an eight-minute excerpt of HILLEMAN: A Perilous Quest to Save the World’s Children to remind families of the importance of annual influenza vaccines. Families Fighting Flu has made the film a central component of its fall awareness efforts. According to Serese Marotta, Chief Operating Officer of Families Fighting Flu,

“Every year, we remind families of the importance of influenza vaccination, often with members of our organization sharing their own personal experiences. This year, we hope that by sharing the film clip along with our personal stories, even more families will be compelled to prioritize influenza vaccination for themselves.”

Visit the Vaccine Makers Project to view a list of upcoming film screenings, gain access to the free educational materials, or to make an inquiry about the project.

For more information about influenza, visit the Vaccine Education Center at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia for an in-depth look at the flu vaccine and an influenza fact sheet.  And visit the Families Fighting Flu website to read stories of families who have been adversely affected by flu, view flu facts and download the Community Toolkit and other educational materials

Comprehensive Vaccine App Available on iPhones and iPads

(note that this post originally appeared in 2017 and has been updated with the latest version of the app).

If you’re looking for a comprehensive source of vaccine information, look no further than The Vaccine Handbook App, now available for Apple iPhones and iPads.  

This free downloadable App serves as an enhanced digital version of the new 2018 (7th) edition of The Vaccine Handbook: A Practical Guide for Clinicians (often referred to as “The Purple Book”).    

This book, written by Dr. Gary Marshall, professor of pediatrics and chief of the Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases at the University of Louisville, was first published in 2004.  Each edition of The Vaccine Handbook compiles a wide variety of information on vaccine science, guidance, and practice into one easily accessible user-friendly resource.

The App, which was first released in 2016 , was updated in April 2017, and June 2018.  It  contains the new 7th edition of the book and the program has been enhanced in many new ways. The electronic version of The Purple Book is fully searchable, with functionality that includes bookmarking, highlighting, user annotation and active links to content on the Internet. There is also a resource section in the App that complements the book with links to vaccine websites, governmental organizations, manufacturers, and various advocacy groups, including Every Child By Two.

VaccineAppLandingPage

Dr. Marshall elaborates on the intent of the project by saying,

“From the beginning, the purpose of The Purple Book was to distill down the complex world of vaccine science and practice into something that practitioners could use, not just for optimizing implementation, but for deepening their understanding as well. It’s not just a “how to” guide; it’s a “how to and here’s why” book.”

The Purple Book is ideal for pediatricians, family physicians, internists, obstetrician/gynecologists, nurses, nurse practitioners, physician’s assistants, and clinical staff. Additionally, Dr. Marshall believes the publication can also be used as the basis for a vaccine curriculum for students and residents.  It can even be a useful resource to parents and patients. He explains,

“The content is expansive but the language is plain, simple, and accessible. It covers the rationale behind authoritative immunization recommendations as well as the many contingencies encountered in everyday practice. Beyond this, it provides a readable foundation on how vaccines are developed, tested, and licensed; how vaccine policy is made; what constitutes the vaccine safety net; standards and regulations; billing; office logistics; and much more. It can be read cover-to-cover, or section-by-section.”

VaccineAppNavigation

The book is divided into two sections. 

The first section includes, among other things; 

  • basic principles of vaccine immunology;
  • background on vaccine development, infrastructure and policy;
  • vaccination standards;
  • general vaccine recommendations and implementation;
  • vaccination schedules;
  • vaccination in special circumstances;
  • and most importantly, tips on addressing concerns about vaccines.

The second section contains details about every vaccine currently licensed in the United States, as well as; 

  • the burden and epidemiology of the respective diseases,
  • history of the immunization program,
  • vaccine constituents,
  • vaccine efficacy,
  • vaccine safety,
  • and vaccine recommendations.

MaryBeth Koslap-Petraco, Pediatric Nurse Practitioner and Adjunct Clinical Assistant Professor at Stony Brook University School of Nursing, had this to share about her experiences using the App:

 “The App is perfect for accessing vaccine information without having to carry around the book. I was preparing a lecture for school nurses about vaccine hesitancy and I used the app on my phone. It was incredibly quick and easy to locate the information I was looking for in the index and then scroll to the specific pages I needed.  Upon opening the App I found the section buttons right on the first page.  I then went directly to the “Addressing Concerns” section which included information on vaccine refusal, communicating risks and benefits, and other topics related to vaccine concerns.  All of the information I needed, along with a complete list of references, was right in one place. If you’re someone who wants to have a full array of vaccine information at your fingertips, than I highly recommend that you download this App.” 

purplebookimage

 

Dr. Marshall adds,

“I am particularly proud of this iteration of The Purple Book. First, it is dedicated to Dr. Stanley Plotkin, with whom I trained in the 1980s and who stands out as mentor and friend to generations of physicians and scientists. Second, the Foreword was written by the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society, which was founded by Stanley exactly 40 years ago. Finally, PIDS was able, through unrestricted educational funding, to make the app available free of charge to anyone who wants it.”

Download it today and let us know what you think in the comments below.

Got Questions? It’s OK to Ask

OKtoAsklogoWe all have questions and concerns when it comes to immunizations for our children.   That’s the premise behind the Vermont Department of Health’s bold new immunization campaign It’s OK to Ask.

In a state that once boasted some of the healthiest kids in the nation, falling immunization rates, rising school vaccine exemption rates, and a recent epidemic of pertussis in the state of Vermont are all reminders that when it comes to public health we must remain vigilant.  In a recent interview, Nancy Erikson, Communication Director of the Vermont Department of Health explains that the goal of this new campaign is to transform parental hesitance into confidence. She goes on to explain that the It’s OK To Ask campaign addresses the most common questions about vaccines in hopes of empowering people to make the best immunization decisions they can for themselves and their families.

The website, launched just a few months ago, not only offers detailed information about vaccines and the diseases they help prevent, it also includes an engaging “Ask an Expert” section which connects users to a special panel of Vermont doctors and nurses who have volunteered to address individual immunization questions received through the site.  Other highlights of the website include videos of Vermont parents discussing popular immunization topics with Burlington-based Dr. Hagan, and an innovative timeline created in collaboration with the historyofvaccines.org, which reflects on 300 years of immunization milestones in the fight against dangerous and deadly diseases.  Read more…