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Updates from June 2017 Meeting of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices

July 13, 2017 2 comments

Original Title: BLDG21_0023.jpg

Recently, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) met to discuss several important developments concerning vaccines. As you may be aware, this impartial group of experts advises the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on all matters related to vaccine recommendations. In the coming years, the ability of the CDC and public health departments to implement the recommendations of this group may be under threat from proposed provisions within the health care reform bills and congressional budget cuts.

The activities of the ACIP are supported by staff at the CDC, which receives annual appropriations from the federal government to fulfill its duties.  This federal immunization funding is at risk of being drastically cut if the Prevention and Public Health Fund (PPHF) is eliminated. (Click here to see a breakdown of the impact of the elimination of the PPHF funds by state.) If Congress follows the recommendation of the President, funding will be reduced by another 14% beginning in Fiscal Year (FY) 2018.

The result is that CDC may no longer be able to fully support its immunization functions including:

  • ACIP staffing;
  • Vaccine purchase and supply management;
  • Vaccine safety monitoring;
  • Education initiatives;
  • Disease surveillance;
  • Outbreak response; and
  • Funding support for state, territory, and city immunization programs.

An example of the critical activities conducted by the CDC includes support for the ACIP.  This committee of experts from diverse fields such as vaccinology, immunology, pediatrics, internal medicine, nursing, family medicine, virology, public health, infectious diseases, and\preventive medicine meets three times a year to review and discuss vaccine research and scientific data related to vaccine effectiveness and safety, clinical trial results, outbreaks of vaccine-preventable disease or changes in vaccine supply.

There are 15 voting members, 8 ex officio members who represent other federal agencies with responsibility for immunization programs in the United States, and 30 non-voting representatives of liaison organizations that bring related immunization expertise. All members volunteer their time and come from many leading professional and public organizations such as the American Academy of Pediatrics, the National Foundation for Infectious Diseases, and the American Geriatrics Society. This is the only meeting to gather such a comprehensive group of experts whose aim it is to protect individual and public health.

The current health care reform discussions that are happening in Congress may have a direct impact on this Committee. Please continue to reach out to your Representatives and Senators to let them know the importance of keeping PPHF and CDC fully funded. (You can find your Members of Congress at http://whoismyrepresentative.com/ and some suggestive language to share here.) 

The value of the ACIP can not be overstated. During their most recent committee meeting in June, members discussed several important issues recapped in the summary below.

Read more…

October Updates from Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices

October 26, 2016 3 comments

10693.jpgLast week, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) held it’s third and final meeting of 2016.  The agenda included presentations pertaining to hepatitis B, pertussis, HPV, meningococcal, herpes zoster, pneumococcal and RSV vaccines, and surveillance updates on Zika and influenza viruses.

During the two-day meeting, the committee took nine votes on newly proposed vaccine recommendations that addressed vaccination timing, number of doses needed, and dosing intervals for hepatitis B, pertussis, HPV and meningococcal vaccines.  They also approved the child, adolescent and adult immunization schedules.

This post provides a recap of each agenda item in the order they occurred. 

Hepatitis B Vaccine

The recommended first dose of the three-series hepatitis B vaccine is often referred to as “birth dose” and is typically administered to infants in the hospital after birth.  At this meeting, the Hepatitis B Work Group asked that the Committee consider removal of the permissive language that appears at the end of the recommendation which allows for a delay of the birth dose until after hospital discharge.

When hepatitis B vaccine is administered within 24 hours of birth it can help prevent transmission of the hepatitis B virus from an infected mother to her child.  The intent of the birth dose is to provide an additional safety net to prevent transmission from HepB positive mothers that are not properly identified due to errors in maternal testing or reporting. In these instances, when the mother is not properly identified as HepB positive before birth, the HepB vaccine alone is 75% effective in preventing prenatal transmission, and 94% effective when used in conjunction with Hepatitis B immune globulin.

Since delaying hepatitis B vaccination can interfere with the prevention of Hepatitis B – especially in a child unknowingly born to a HepB positive mother – the HepB Work Group proposed that the reference to delaying vaccination be removed from the recommendation.  It had originally been added in 2005, but the data suggests that administering the birth dose in the hospital leads to timely completion of the series. The current birth dose coverage was stated to be 72.4% of children, which remains below the Healthy People 2020 goal of 84%.

The Committee voted to remove the permissive language as well as include new language to clarify that the first dose of vaccine should be administered within 24 hours of birth, which is more explicit than “before hospital discharge”.

The anticipated changes to the previous recommendation are indicated below, however the exact wording may differ once published by the CDC:

“For all medically stable infants weighing 2,000 grams or more at birth and born to HBsAg-negative mothers, the first dose of vaccine should be administered before hospital discharge within 24 hours of birth.  Only single antigen HepB vaccine should be used for the birth dose. On a case-by-case basis and only in rare circumstances, the first dose may be delayed until after hospital discharge for an infant who weighs 2,000 grams or more and whose mother is HBsAG-negative.

*It should be noted that for those infants with birth weight of less than 2,000 grams, the birth dose is not counted as part of the vaccine series.

There was some discussion concerning the removal of the option to delay vaccination and it was emphasized that having a clear recommendation from the ACIP is not a vaccine mandate.  Rather, practitioners, public health professionals and parents rely on the ACIP recommendations as expert guidance and best practice. The Hepatitis B “birth dose” has been a successful strategy to help eliminate hepatitis B virus transmission in the U.S., and the ACIP’s revised recommendations only emphasize the importance of vaccinating within the 24 hours timeframe that will help prevent further transmission.

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Other key updates to the hepatitis B vaccine recommendations included:

  • Providing examples of chronic liver disease, including recommending HepB vaccine for persons with HCV infection.
  • Post vaccination serologic testing for infants who’s mother’s HBsAg status remains  unknown indefinitely.
  • Testing HBsAg-positive pregnant women for HBV DNA.

For more information as to why babies need a Hepatitis B vaccine at birth, read these Shot of Prevention blog posts here

Pertussis Vaccine

The Committee reviewed the history of Tdap vaccination in pregnant women and reviewed studies that found that maternal Tdap vaccination to both safe and effective at preventing infant pertussis. Read more…

Highlights from June Meeting of Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices

June 30, 2016 1 comment

Original Title: BLDG21_0023.jpg

Three times a year a specialized group of medical and public health experts meet to review scientific data related to vaccine safety and effectiveness. This group, known as the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP), has an enormous responsibility.  They establish, update and continually evaluate all the vaccine recommendations that are made in the United States for infants, adolescents and adults. Health insurance coverage of vaccines is based on these recommendations and the ACIP guidelines are considered the gold standard among healthcare providers.

Last week, in their second meeting of 2016, the ACIP discussed cholera, meningococcal, hepatitis, influenza, RSV and HPV vaccines, as well as the safety of maternal Tdap immunization and the laboratory containment of Poliovirus Type 2.  

Below you will find a recap of the highlights of the June 2016 ACIP meeting to help keep you informed of the latest ACIP recommendations and considerations. 

Influenza Vaccine

The most significant and somewhat surprising decision that occurred during last week’s ACIP meeting was that the Committee voted in favor of an interim recommendation that live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV), also known as the nasal spray flu vaccine, should not be used during the 2016-2017 flu season. 

The vote followed an extensive review of data investigating the effectiveness of the nasal spray flu vaccine over the past three flu seasons.  The data showed vaccine effectiveness for nasal spray vaccine among children 2 through 17 years during 2015-2016 was only 3% effective (with a 95% Confidence Interval of -49-37%). In comparison, flu shots had a vaccine effectiveness estimate of 63% against any flu virus among children 2 through 17 years (with a 95% Confidence Interval of 52-72%). This estimate clearly indicates that while no protective benefit could be measured from the nasal spray vaccine in this past season, flu shots provided measurable protection in comparison.

The disappointing vaccine effectiveness data for the nasal spray vaccine during the 2015-2016 season follows two previous seasons (2013-2014 and 2014-2015) that also showed poor and/or lower than expected vaccine effectiveness for LAIV.  (More information about past LAIV VE data is available here.)

child_h1n1_flu_shotWhile it’s disheartening to see data suggesting that the nasal spray flu vaccine did not work as well as expected, the data did suggest that flu shots did perform well and offered substantial protection against influenza this past season. Some patients prefer the nasal spray flu vaccine due to an aversion to needles and may be disappointed in this vote. However, the action taken by the ACIP  emphasizes the important role they fill in continually measuring and evaluating vaccine effectiveness.  Only after a thorough review of the latest scientific data and discussion among the Committee do they decide to alter vaccine recommendations to ensure that they are in the best interest of the public’s health.

ACIP continues to recommend annual flu vaccination, with either the inactivated influenza vaccine (IIV) or recombinant influenza vaccine (RIV) for everyone 6 months and older and the CDC expects that there should be no shortage of injectable vaccines.  However, it should be noted that with the ACIP vote the nasal spray flu vaccine should not be used during the 2016-2017 season and therefore should not be offered by providers or clinics and will not be covered under the Vaccines For Children (VFC) program.

Cholera Vaccine

A vote was taken to recommend the vaccine for people traveling to high risk areas. 

For more information about cholera visit the CDC travel page here and for up-to-date travel alerts that address various destinations and diseases, we recommend visiting Passport Health’s travel alerts here.

Meningococcal Vaccine

The first part of the discussion of meningococcal vaccines was a consideration of the data on the serogroup B vaccine Trumenba.  This particular vaccine is currently administered on a three dose schedule, however Pfizer’s Dr. Laura York indicated during her presentation that the FDA has approved both a 2 and 3 dose schedule based on the data showing both schedules to be considered safe and effective.  While immunity data suggests that the 3 dose schedule may confer slightly greater immunity over longer periods of time, the 2 dose schedule would be considered optimal in the case of an outbreak or when it is important to confer rapid immunity.   The committee will be reviewing more data on the duration of immunity and the safety of a 2 dose versus 3 dose schedule at the October meeting, before a formal recommendation is made for persons at increased risk, for use during outbreaks or for all healthy adolescents. Read more…

Highlights of the Latest Meeting of the Advisory Committee On Immunization Practices

February 26, 2016 4 comments

Three times a year a specialized group of medical and public health experts meet in Atlanta to review scientific data related to vaccine safety and effectiveness. Although most people are probably unaware that these meetings occur, this is not some clandestine group.  Far from it actually.  Meeting dates and proposed agendas are available in advance, all meetings are open to the public and available via webcast, public comments are accepted, and past meeting notes and slide presentations are accessible online.

What amazes me is that the 15 voting members, 8 ex officio members and 30 non-voting representatives of this group participate voluntarily.  In addition to the three meetings per year, members serve in various work groups that are active all year long.  Work groups  review the latest studies on specific vaccines, as well as the safety and efficacy of those vaccines, in order to provide recommendations to the larger committee.

They work hard and take their responsibilities very seriously.  And they should, because this group, known as The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP), has an enormous responsibility.  They establish, update and continually evaluate all the vaccine recommendations that are made in the United States for infants, adolescents and adults.  These guidelines are considered the gold standard among healthcare providers and health insurance coverage of vaccines is based on these recommendations.

Original Title: BLDG21_0023.jpgIf you’ve ever attended a meeting or tuned in to a live webcast, you know how thorough they are in their investigation of the science that is the driving factor behind every recommendation they make.  Earlier this week, in their first meeting of 2016, ACIP members discussed a variety of vaccines to include HPV, meningococcal, influenza and Japanese encephalitis, as well as Zika virus. For those who were unable to attend the meeting or tune in via webcast, I would like to provide a brief recap of the major discussion items.

HPV Vaccination: 

The discussion focused on the ongoing review of data comparing the immunogenicity of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine after a 2 dose schedule versus a 3 dose schedule. 

As early as June 2014, the ACIP began reviewing data for 2 dose bivalent and quadrivalent HPV vaccines.  The World Health Organization has been recommending a 2 dose schedule since 2014 for children starting the series before age 15 and most other countries who primarily administer bivalent or quadrivalent HPV vaccines are already using a 2 dose schedule.  These 2 dose schedules are recommended in foreign countries for use with the bivalent and quadrivalent vaccines.  Here in the U.S. the ACIP began recommending the 9-valent HPV vaccine, which provides protection from additional strains of HPV in February, 2015.  Vaccination with 3 doses was recommended at that time.

In evaluating the possibility of reducing the number of doses from 2 to 3 here in the U.S., the ACIP reviewed data on the immunogenicity of a 2 dose versus 3 dose HPV vaccination schedule to determine whether a different schedule could provide similar, acceptable levels of protection in the months and years following vaccination as compared to what is expected with a 3 dose schedule. The Committee reviewed three studies comparing 2 doses versus 3 doses of the bivalent HPV vaccine, three studies comparing 2 doses versus 3 doses of quadrivalent vaccine (one from Canada, one from Mexico and a large trial from India), and preliminary findings from a ongoing study of 9-valent vaccine that is expected to continue for two more years.

Each study was conducted slightly differently and provided an extensive amount of data to consider. For instance, some studies differentiated between the timing of the doses, (such as 0, 6 month dosing and 0, 12 months dosing versus the 0, 6, 12 month interval that is currently recommended).  Some studies also accounted for differences in gender, ages of administration of doses (for instance, young girls versus older women and girls versus boys).  There was even data that differentiated between the seroconversion rates at different intervals after vaccination and among the antibody titers for the different HPV types.

The data appears to suggest that a 2 dose schedule may be a consideration moving forward.  However, the ACIP’s HPV Work Group still needs to evaluate all the data in greater detail before they can present their recommendations for further discussion and approval by the entire ACIP Committee at a future meeting.

The Committee still needs to consider that completion of a 2 dose regimen would be important since the effectiveness of a single dose is known to be lower.  Currently,  completion rates for the 3 dose regimen remains suboptimal and there would be even less flexibility in a 2 dose regimen.  Additionally, the duration of protection from a 2 dose 9-valent vaccine has not been determined, but is currently undergoing investigation.  This type of data will likely need to be evaluated in comparison to a 3 dose schedule before proceeding with a change of recommendation.

A study released earlier this week suggests that we may be witnessing a herd effect with HPV vaccine.  Despite only 40% of girls and 22% of boys being vaccinated, the rate of HPV infections among young women has plummeted by two-thirds since the introduction of the vaccine.  Before altering the current recommendations, the Committee may also want to consider the comparative herd effect in a 2 dose versus 3 dose schedule.

It was noted that  the vaccine manufacturer is seeking FDA approval of a 2 dose 9-valent HPV vaccine, which should be determined within the year.  In the meantime, if the ACIP were to recommend a 2 dose schedule before the FDA review is complete, the recommendation would be considered off label. Although some may question an off label recommendation, the ACIP has made other off label recommendations when sufficient evidence suggests it is reasonable to do so.

Meningococcal Vaccine: 

The ACIP reviewed several post-approval studies of meningococcal serogroup B vaccine  to further evaluate the vaccine’s safety and efficacy profile.  Additionally, the Committee was presented with data from a mass immunization campaign that occurred in response to a large meningococcal serogroup B outbreak in Quebec, Canada.  There was also discussion pertaining to a possible increased risk of meningococcal disease among HIV infected persons.

As background, it was noted that the ACIP issued a recommendation for meningococcal serogroup B vaccine in 2015 following FDA licensure.  Prior to the licensure of the vaccine, the FDA approved special use of the vaccine in response to outbreaks of the disease on various college campuses.   While both the ACIP and the FDA have previously reviewed the efficacy and safety data available from pre-licensure vaccine trials, and from the use of the vaccine in many countries that have licensed and administered the vaccine ahead of the U.S., the Committee will continue to review post-approval studies to ensure the vaccine’s safety and efficacy.

This week, the Committee reviewed four safety and immunogenicity studies, all of which demonstrated a high proportion of individuals who achieved a high consistency of response across the studies.  The safety profile seemed consistent with the safety data at licensure and phase three studies confirmed that the vaccine elicits bacterial responses that correlate to protection against the four most prevalent strains circulating in the U.S., as well as 10 additional strains.  The data continued to demonstrate broad protective response when used for both outbreak control and prevention of endemic disease.

Additionally, there was a review of a mass immunization campaign following a significant outbreak in Quebec, Canada.  The data suggests direct protection during 18 months following vaccination with 100% vaccine effectiveness observed among the 47,115 vaccinated people and two cases among two unvaccinated adults.  There was additional data presented on the safety profile and observational evidence pertaining to adverse events such as pain and fever post injection.

The meningococcal vaccine discussion also suggested that there is a growing body of evidence that supports an increased risk of meningococcal disease among HIV-infected persons.  This is of particular interest since the ACIP doesn’t currently include HIV-infected persons on the list of people at high risk.  This is largely due to evidence that suggests that the meningococcal vaccine offers suboptimal vaccine response and duration of protection among this particular demographic of HIV-infected persons.  In contrast, the American Academy of Pediatrics does in fact recommend MenACWY vaccine for HIV infected persons ages 2 and up.  So, while the Meningococcal Work Group seems supportive of adding a recommendation to include HIV infected persons, they will continue to review additional data and will report back to the full Committee at a future meeting.

During the public comment period of the meeting, Lynn Bozof from the National Meningitis Association, raised the concern that the public is having difficulty locating MenB vaccine.  She provided anecdotal evidence that her member families seeking MenB vaccination for their children have had to make up to five calls to providers to gain access to the vaccine.  She feared that less motivated families would simply give up.  She asked that the ACIP consider the ramifications of their permissive Category B recommendation for MenB vaccination, which in her opinion does not carry the strength of a full Category A recommendation.

ACIP’s current recommendation as posted on the CDC website states that “Teens and young adults (16 through 23 year olds) may also be vaccinated with a serogroup B meningococcal vaccine (Bexsero® or Trumenba®), preferably at 16 through 18 years old. Two or three doses are needed depending on the brand.”  “Preteens, teens, and young adults should be vaccinated with a serogroup B meningococcal vaccine if they are identified as being at increased risk of meningococcal disease.”  This is quite different than the Category A recommendation for the vaccine to prevent the A,C,W and Y strains of meningococcal.  The recommendation states that “all 11 to 12 year olds should be vaccinated with a single dose of a quadrivalent (protects against serogroups A, C, W, and Y) meningococcal conjugate vaccine (Menactra® or Menveo®)”.   The small differences in recommendation types can make a big difference in the number of individuals who are offered the vaccine, have access to the vaccine and ultimately get vaccinated.

Influenza Vaccine: 

There were two significant discussions pertaining to influenza vaccine.  First, the CDC announced that based on interim vaccine effectiveness data it appears that getting a flu vaccine this season has helped reduced the risk of having to go to the doctor because of flu by 59%.  Additionally, data suggests that there is a very low rate of adverse reaction to flu vaccine in people who have egg allergy and that since the same reactions occur at the same rate in non-egg-allergic people, the ACIP will be removing egg allergy warnings for influenza vaccination. 

The influenza surveillance data from this season indicates that influenza activity in the U.S. has been lower this season than in the last three seasons, and that there is a good match between the most common circulating viruses (A (H1N1) and B) which may explain why the vaccine is offering significant protection this season.  It was also noted that there have been 13 pediatric deaths this season.

The Committee also learned that among the 73.7 million children in the U.S., 1.3% or approximately 958,100 children have some type of egg allergy.  Current flu vaccine recommendations for those with allergy to egg are quite extensive, including a long algorithm which must be considered by vaccine administrators.  The recommendation that children be monitored post vaccination or seek the advice of an allergist may result in parents avoiding influenza vaccine all together for their children.  However, this may no longer need to be the case.

In the review of 27 published studies involving flu vaccine and egg allergy, most studies included patients with history of severe anaphylaxis with egg ingestion. These patients tolerated the vaccine without any serious reactions such as respiratory distress or hypotension.  While there was a very low rate of minor reactions such as hives and mild wheezing, these reactions occurred in non-egg-allergic people at the same rate.  Similarly, there was a one in one million chance of anaphylactic reaction to flu vaccine among egg-allergic people, which is the same rate in response to flu and other vaccines in non-egg-allergic people.  The research suggests that there haven’t been serious reactions to flu vaccine in people with egg allergies because flu vaccines contain minimal egg ovalbumin and therefore are unlikely to cause a reaction in egg-allergic people.  In fact, it was demonstrated that the manufacturers have actually over-estimated the amount of egg ovalbumin contained in both the IIV (injected) and LAIV (live attenuated/nasal) vaccines.

Based on the Committee’s review of this data, the ACIP voted to remove the precautions about IIV and LAIV flu vaccine for people with a history of egg allergy.  The ACIP Influenza Work Group was tasked with developing the exact wording of the recommendation post-meeting, which will be approved for the 2016-2017 season.  Stay tuned for the exact recommendation changes.

Japanese encephalitis vaccine:

The ACIP reviewed data on the current recommendation for travelers to receive Japanese encephalitis vaccination.  Studies regarding the safety of the vaccine and duration were presented to the Committee and it was determined that there was insufficient data to spur the inclusion of a booster (2nd) dose of the vaccine.  The latest data will however be included in an upcoming MMWR and further considered at a future meeting.

Zika Virus:

The Committee was given an overview of the international efforts to quell outbreaks of the Zika virus and develop a potential vaccine to protect against future infections worldwide.  Collaboration among global experts was similar to the impressive response to the Ebola outbreaks and the conversation regarding the potential for a future vaccine was encouraging.

While this recap offers a glimpse into the type of considerations that the ACIP addresses and the extensive amount of research they regularly review, these highlights do not go into the length necessary to recount the entire meeting.  If you should be interested in seeing the slide presentations made to the Committee, simply check for the slides to be updated here within the next week or two.  If you should have questions, please let us know in the comments below and we will do our best to address them.  Additionally, by subscribing to this Shot of Prevention blog in the upper right corner of the page you can ensure that you will receive notice of ACIP updates and meeting recaps in the future.

New ACIP Recommendations for Meningococcal, Influenza and HPV Vaccines

March 10, 2015 3 comments
Photo Credit: James Gathany, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Photo Credit: James Gathany, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

written by: Amy Pisani, MS, Executive Director, Every Child By Two

The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) conducted an abbreviated meeting on February 26, 2015 due to the threat of a winter storm in the Atlanta, Georgia region.  The ACIP, which consists of 15 voting members who have expertise in vaccinology, immunology, healthcare and public health, makes recommendations to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) regarding vaccinations approved for use by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).  The recommendations pertain to the timing and intervals of vaccines which are included on the childhood, adolescent and adult immunization schedules.   At this February meeting, the ACIP conducted three important votes which altered or created new recommendations for meningococcal vaccine, influenza vaccine and HPV vaccine.  

Meningococcal Serogroup B Vaccine

Two new vaccines to protect against meningococcal serogroup B, which has been spreading through college campuses in recent years, were recently approved by the FDA. The Trumenba vaccine is developed by Pfizer Pharmaceuticals and requires three doses and the Bexsero vaccine has been developed by Novartis Vaccines and Diagnostics requiring two doses.  The ACIP has previously recommended one dose of MCV4 vaccine at ages 11-12, and a booster at age 16 to protects against the A, C, W and Y strains of meningococcal bacteria   Nearly 80% of teens between the ages of 13 and 17 have received at least one dose of the MCV4 vaccine, which is fairly remarkable considering the fact that it is recommended, but not mandated for use within states nationwide.  However, because of the complicated nature of the virus, the new meningococcal serogroup B vaccine would require a separate series of shots, in addition to those recommended for MCV4 vaccine.

The serogroup B strain of meningococcal is considered the most common cause of meningococcal disease  among adolescents here in the U.S. with a fatality rate of 12 percent in 11-19 year olds and 17 percent in 20 year olds over the last 14 years.  While the number of meningococcal cases have declined since 1996, many advocates believe that the aggressive nature of this disease, which often kills or maims it’s victims within hours, necessitates a broad recommendation for the vaccine.  However, the ACIP discussion at the February meeting was limited to recommendations for those at high risk for serogroup B infection, with a follow up vote anticipated at the upcoming June meeting where the Committee will review data and make a determination on whether to recommend the vaccine for a broader population. Authors note-  added June 2015: At the June ACIP meeting the following recommendation was made “A serogroup B meningococcal (MenB) vaccine series may be administered to adolescents and young adults 16 through 23 years of age to provide short term protection against most strains of serogroup B meningococcal disease. The preferred age for MenB vaccination is 16 through 18 years of age.”

Several advocates traveled to the meeting to provide their testimonials.  These included parents of those lost to the disease as well as survivors who have suffered amputations and serious life-long health consequences of this invasive disease.  Dr. Mary Ferris, who helped lead efforts to contain the 2014 meningococcal outbreak at University of California’s Santa Barbara campus, provided compelling testimony regarding the impact of the outbreak on the university.  Ferris noted that four cases, one of which led to the amputation of a student, spread panic throughout the campus and the local community.  Students were banned from volunteering at the on-campus daycare and attempts were made by the local community to close the campus entirely.   Dr. Ferris urged the Committee to consider the broadest recommendation Read more…

Meningitis Survivor Advocates for MenB Vaccine

February 26, 2015 2 comments

My name is Jamie Schanbaum and I am a meningitis survivor.

The year before Jamie was hospitalized with meningococcal disease, she was a high school graduate with great aspirations for the future.  No one could have predicted how her life would change.

The year before I was hospitalized, I graduated high school with great aspirations for my future. No one could have ever predicted how my life would be changed by meningococcal disease.

I’m here to tell you that meningitis is not only life changing, but it is deadly. In 2008 I was diagnosed with meningococcal septicemia, which left me with serious life weighing decisions.  Within 14 hours from my first symptom, I was told that I had a 20 percent chance of surviving.  Then I was told that I was going to have to have some of my limbs amputated.   At the age of 20, my life had been average.  But within hours it transitioned to detrimental.  Seven months later, I finally stepped out (or more so, wheeled out) of the hospital.  I was alive, but I had lost the bottom half of my legs and all of my fingers.

There is no way anyone could have predicted that this would be my life.  I had so many expectations for the future before I got meningitis, and suddenly all that had changed.  I left the hospital with never-ending doubts of what my life would be like.  I’m now 26, and every day I live with the consequences of meningitis and the fact that I was not vaccinated.

That is why in 2009, my family and I became instrumental in educating the public about the dangers of meningitis and advocating for new Texas legislation that would require college students, living in public and private facilities, to get vaccinated.  Then in 2011, we worked to amend the bill so that all college students in the state of Texas would be required to get the meningitis vaccine before enrolling in classes.  I am honored that ever since The Jamie Schanbaum & Nicolas Williams Act was enacted, the number of meningitis cases in the state of Texas has continued to decrease.  Texas was the first state to implement this law, and I am hopeful that other states will follow.

Today we have an opportunity to s562561_10150765439539076_304512202_nave even more lives, and spare others from suffering the same permanent consequences as I have.  This week the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) will consider whether to recommend the newly approved serogroup B meningococcal vaccine.   The current meningitis vaccine that children are recommended to receive between ages 11-12, and then again with a booster at age 16, hasn’t been 100% capable of covering all five strains of meningitis.  The serogroup B strain, which can now be prevented with this newly approved vaccine, is a very dangerous strain and we’ve recently seen an increase in the number of cases on college campuses across the U.S.  Now more than ever, we need to seize the moment and make sure the public is protected from as many forms of meningitis as possible. Read more…

Focusing On Meningococcal Disease

February 23, 2015 1 comment

MeningococcalThere are five main serogroups (“strains”) of meningococcal bacteria: A, B, C, Y, and W. While the meningococcal vaccine that is currently on the CDC’s recommended immunization schedule covers the A,C, Y and W strains, it does not cover serogroup B. However, in 2012 there were about 500 total cases of meningococcal disease in the U.S, and 160 of those cases were caused by the serogroup B strain. When factoring in recent outbreaks, serogroup B now causes 40% of all meningococcal disease cases among 11-24 year olds.

Fortunately, in October 2014, the FDA approved a new meningococcal vaccine called MenB that covers the serogroup B strain.  This Wednesday, February 25, 2015, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) will be voting on the details of a formal recommendation for the MenB vaccine.  

In advance of this vote, we’re featuring several guest posts this week that highlight the impact of meningococcal disease.

Today’s guest post was written by PKIDS:

At PKIDs, we help families affected by infectious diseases, and we work to educate ourselves and others about these diseases. Our goal is to prevent infections.

In 2015, we’re turning the spotlight on meningitis, or more accurately, meningococcal disease.

Meningitis is scary—and confusing. For instance, if I say that I have meningitis, it sounds like I’m saying I’m infected with a germ called meningitis. But, there is no germ called “meningitis.”

Adding to the confusion is the fact that we tend to use that term loosely for what should be called “meningococcal disease.”

Meningococcal disease causes meningitis, and it may also cause blood poisoning (septicemia).

WHAT IS MENINGITIS?

Read more…